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    #1

    Question In the rain which is getting heavier and heavier...

    We ran very fast in the rain which was getting heavier and heavier.

    The above sentence is what I could think of to express "run" and "the rain becomes heavier and heavier" at the same time.
    I am wondering if there is any proper adjective that can replace the relative clause.

    We ran very fast in the _________ rain.
    Is "intensifying" ok to use? How about "heavier-getting"? Or other words?

    • Member Info
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    #2

    Re: In the rain which is getting heavier and heavier...

    Welcome to the forum.

    Most people would understand 'in the worsening rain'.

    Definitely not 'heavier-getting'.

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