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    #1

    whose mother?

    Hi. I am confused about the following sentence which I saw in a grammar book. May you please help me?

    Marry and Kate went to airport to take her mother. In this sentence does 'her' refer to Marry's mother or Kate's mother and can I think that they went to airport to take a third person's mother?

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    #2

    Re: whose mother?

    It's not a good sentence. We would say that she "took her mother to the airport." Not that she "went to the airport to take her mother."

    The identity of the mother is ambiguous. If Mary (note the spelling) and Kate are sisters, then it would be "their" mother. If it is really supposed to be the mother of only one "her" then it is unclear from just this sentence whose mother they are talking about. It could be Mary, Kate, or some other person.

    "Mary and Kate took Kate's mother to the airport" would be a clear way to write, to give one example.

  1. Roman55's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: whose mother?

    Quote Originally Posted by ercantuncer View Post
    Marry and Kate went to airport to take her mother.
    I am not a teacher.

    If you've copied this correctly from your grammar book, throw it away and get a new one.

    You're right that we can't know from this whose mother it is.

    Apart from that problem, you don't go to an airport to take somebody. You take somebody to the airport, or you go there to take somebody somewhere else.

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    #4

    Re: whose mother?

    I understood how to use ' take somebody to the airport' Thanks. Can I say that:

    I will take you from airport. Is it correct or is there a other verb for this situation?

    My friend is lost called me and described the place and said ' Come here and take me from here' Is it ok 'take somebody from somewhere' ?

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    #5

    Re: whose mother?

    Use "collect from" or "pick up from".

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    #6

    Re: whose mother?

    If your friend is lost, they would say "Please come and get me!"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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