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  1. nininaz's Avatar
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    #1

    Exclamation In which

    "London has the oldest underground railway systems among the six cities. It was opened in the year 1863, and it is already 140 years old. Paris is the second oldest, in which it was opened in the year 1900. "

    Is 'in which' replaced by 'where' ?
    why it can't be 'which' instead of 'in which' ?

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: In which

    No. "in which" could be replaced by "in that", or "because", or "since".
    "...which it was opened.." is not an acceptable alternative. Interestingly, it would have been quite acceptable (in British English, at least) some 250 years ago; but this usage is no longer valid.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: In which

    This feels to me like a translation: the 'already' sounds a bit odd.

    Apart from this, the 'in which' is uncomfortable (at best; personally, I'd call it wrong), the 3rd 'it' isn't entirely successful either. In place of the last sentence, I'd say something like 'The Paris Métro is the second oldest; it opened in 1900.'

    I don't understand your first question. It hasn't been. Do you mean 'Can' or 'could'? It would be slightly better than 'in which', but still wrong. Paris isn't the second oldest anything. It has the second oldest underground railway system.

    As you know I regard 'in which' as wrong, but it's less wrong than 'which' The word 'in' could be used in the sentence: In Paris [you will find|either/or|can be found] the second oldest... which was opened in 1900.

    And I'm sure you can tell what's wrong with your last question, if you think about it.

    b

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