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    #1

    Crunchy and soft texture.

    Vegetables cooked in right timing will give a crunchy texture otherwise over cooked will give a soft texture.

    What texture should be used in sentence above? Are them used correctly?

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  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Crunchy and soft texture.

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonree123456 View Post
    "Vegetables cooked in right timing will give a crunchy texture otherwise over cooked will give a soft texture."

    What texture adjectives should be used in the sentence above? Are them they used correctly?
    "Crunchy" and "soft" are acceptable adjectives to use with vegetables. They are crunchy when they are raw or lightly cooked and go soft (or mushy) when cooked for longer.

    However, "Vegetables cooked in right timing" is not grammatical. "Otherwise" was not used correctly either. Try to rewrite your sentence using alternative words/phrases.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Crunchy and soft texture.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Crunchy" and "soft" are acceptable adjectives to use with vegetables. They are crunchy when they are raw or lightly cooked and go soft (or mushy) when cooked for longer.

    However, "Vegetables cooked in right timing" is not grammatical. "Otherwise" was not used correctly either. Try to rewrite your sentence using alternative words/phrases.
    Vegetables cooked just right and not overcooked remain crunchy whereas over-cooking makes them mushy.

    I don't think the adjective, 'crunchy' goes with 'texture'.

    not a teacher

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    #4

    Re: Crunchy and soft texture.

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    I don't think the adjective, 'crunchy' goes with 'texture'.
    It does for me.

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    #5

    Re: Crunchy and soft texture.

    It may seem unnecessary, but crunchy texture is fine for me too.

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