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    #1

    regarding the differences between... that you asked

    Hello,

    - Sir, I cannot understand the answer to the question that you have asked regarding the differences between Realism and Romanticism.
    - Sir, I cannot understand the answer to the question regarding the differences between Realism and Romanticism that you have asked.

    I tied to write such sentences. I cannot determine where to put 'regarding the differences....' in such a sentence. In my opinion the first one sounds bettter. What do you think? Which one is better grammatically?

    Thank you.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: regarding the differences between... that you asked

    I agree that the first is much better. The second, though awkward, is not ungrammatical.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: regarding the differences between... that you asked

    Note: I don't know how or why secondary school English and Literature teachers began viewing "romanticism vs. realism" as a useful or meaningful dichotomy. Romanticism was a new form of realism, after over a century of boring Enlightenment rationalism with its contrived happy endings: e.g. Le Fils Naturel (Diderot), in which a love child, in a triumph of reason, ends up being treated as a real son. Everything is perfect in this new, rational world of civilized men. All that was as realistic as Communism's New Man. Romanticism broke the mould, and began to view suffering and human tragedy as art once again. Romanticism eventually became rather excessive, and exaggerated, but I have never read a "romanticism vs. realism" essay I could make heads or tails of. I don't think such teachers really understand what they are talking about.

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