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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
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    • Join Date: Nov 2014
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    #1

    confusion about a phrase "as in coffee"

    Hello,

    Quoted:
    /With more than 20,000 stores spread across 65 countries, Starbucks has all but redefined coffee and the coffeehouse experience. The company, which started in Seattle in 1971, is known for bringing high-end java to the masses—as in coffee that’s a cut above what you might find in your neighborhood diner./

    I just got confused with the highlighted phrase, does the author mean Starbucks is also known for bringing high-end java in coffee? It's a little bit wierd. So how do I understand the phrase "as in coffee"?

    Thank you!

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: confusion about a phrase "as in coffee"

    "As if coffee" is not the phrase. Also java is just another word for coffee. There's no other substance called 'java' that's in coffee.
    "As in" means something like "another way of putting it being ..." / "by which I mean ..."
    "... high end java" (excellent coffee), as in "coffee that’s a cut above what you might find in your neighborhood diner" (excellent coffee)
    "... high-end java, by which I mean
    coffee that’s a cut above what you might find in your neighborhood diner."

    Conversation
    A: Do you like mice?
    B: As in those computer input things?
    A: No, as in those small furry animals.
    Last edited by Raymott; 14-Dec-2014 at 13:03.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: confusion about a phrase "as in coffee"

    So "high-end java" = "coffee that’s a cut above what you might find in your neighborhood diner". The phrase is not "as in coffee", it's "as in" (meaning "for example") followed by "coffee that’s a cut above what you might find in your neighborhood diner".

    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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