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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Thai
      • Home Country:
      • Thailand
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand

    • Join Date: Oct 2013
    • Posts: 38
    #1

    In lieu and in full and complete discharge

    Hello all,

    I don't understand this sentence. Can anyone reword this sentence?

    To accept the provisions of this Agreement in lieu and in full and complete discharge of any and all interests, rights and claims which otherwise each might or could have.

    Thank you in advance!

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #2

    Re: In lieu and in full and complete discharge

    'In lieu' means instead of. 'Discharge' means completion, settlement, or resolution.
    If you accept the provisions of the Agreement, those provisions are the final settlement of the matter. You cannot come back later and claim more, or change your mind, or think up a reason why you should have more rights in the matter.

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