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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    If you will keep going

    Mr. Reed: Yes, that’s right. But you can’t stop there. Along with your visualization, you also have to actually start doing things to work towards your goal. Goals and visualizations are meaningless without action.At each step in the process, you should perform a physical act that will get you at least a little bit closer to your goal. If you keep going without giving up, no one will be able to stop you from achieving what you’ve set out to do. This process doesn’t seem too difficult, does it?

    Can you say "if you will keep going" as well if you emphasize your willingness? I think even in an "if clause", you can say "will" to denote some willingness in rare cases.
    Last edited by keannu; 15-Dec-2014 at 16:59.

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: If you will keep going

    Not in this case, and I can't actually think of any scenario where it would be suitable. Anybody?
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: If you will keep going

    Not in that context, no. In BrE, we do use "If you will keep ..." in certain situations, like this one:

    John: My girlfriend dumped me last night.
    Steve: Oh dear. What happened?
    John: She said I never treat her to anything nice.
    Steve: Well, if you will keep taking her to the local pub instead of to a decent restaurant ...!

    The "..." replaces "I'm not surprised" or "that is what is likely to happen".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: If you will keep going

    Bravo! I wish I'd thought of that.

    If you will keep showing me up like that.....
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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    #5

    Re: If you will keep going

    "Will" plus "keep" + verb adds the sense of "will", as in deliberately, to the action. However it usually implies deliberately doing something wrong.


    If you will keep smoking don't be surprised it you get cancer.

    It is more likely a spoken usage with a stress on "will".

  5. keannu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: If you will keep going

    Does only negative willingness go with "will" in if sentence? What about this?

    A : The Richards will drive you to the airport.
    B : If they will drive to the airport, we don't have to take the limousine.

    I've seen this, and in this case, "will" definitely gives a positive nuance, doesn't it?

  6. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: If you will keep going

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post

    A : The Richards will drive you to the airport.
    B : If they will drive to the airport, we don't have to take the limousine.
    For "B" try:

    If they are going to drive you to the airport you don't have to take the limousine.

    or

    If they are going to drive us to the airport we don't have to take the limousine.




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    #8

    Re: If you will keep going

    And how about the following sentences?

    1) If that will help you get it over, I'll lend you the money.
    2) If that will save our family, I'll give up drinking.

    Not a teacher.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: If you will keep going

    Quote Originally Posted by Weaver67 View Post
    And how about the following sentences?

    1) If that will help you get it over, I'll lend you the money.
    2) If that will save our family, I'll give up drinking.

    Not a teacher.
    They're fine if you replace "that" with "it".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. keannu's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: If you will keep going

    There seems to be no rule for adding "will" to if clause. Negative or positive meaning doesn't seem to matter.

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