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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    It is said

    I sometimes feel like not using the structure "It is said (somewhere) that" as a not very natural one. Am I wrong in thinking so?

    Is the following sentence natural (it has been taken from a summary of "Dr Jeckyll and Mr Hyde")?

    It is said in the will that Dr Jeckyll wishes to leave everything he owns to his friend Mr Hyde.

    Or: It is said in the article that... - is it OK?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: It is said

    Yes. "It is said" is perfectly fine in those contexts.


  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: It is said

    I find the first unnatural. I would use:

    It says in the will that ...
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: It is said

    'It is said' is, in my experience, more commonly used to refer to rumours/unestablished truths. So 'it says in the will that...' but 'It is said that his ghost still walks the battlements'.

    My aunty Katy taught me a verse story (I don't think it could be called a poem) that ended:

    'Twas said by neighbours living near ['twas' is an archaic abbreviation for 'it was; people don't use it today - though they do use "'tis": the American argument 'Is not'/'Is so' can be in the UK either 'Is/Isn't' or ''Tis'/'Tisn't]
    A dog was seen with something queer,
    But what it was they'd no idea.


    b

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