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  1. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #1

    at the turn of the 60-s and 70-s of the XX century

    Dear friends,

    Here is the sentence I'd like to ask you about:

    "The progress achieved in the area of database technologies is particularly based on the relational model suggested by E. Codd at the turn of the 60-s and 70-s of the XX century.

    I've hot two questions:

    1) Is the expression "at the turn of" grammatically correct here (the intended meaning is that the relational model mentioned in the sentence was offered at the end of the 1960-s and the beginning of the 1970-s; at the turn of = boundary?)

    2) Is it correct to write "1960-s" meaning "the nineteen sixties" and "1970-s" meaning "the nineteen seventies"?

    Thanks a lot

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    #2

    Re: at the turn of the 60-s and 70-s of the XX century

    1. No. We speak of "the turn of the century." We don't say each decade has a "turn."
    2. "1960s" or "60s" is the normal way to express it. Some may use "1960's" with an apostrophe. A hyphen "60-s" is completely incorrect.

  2. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: at the turn of the 60-s and 70-s of the XX century

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    1. No. We speak of "the turn of the century." We don't say each decade has a "turn."
    What do you say about decades in my context?

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    #4

    Re: at the turn of the 60-s and 70-s of the XX century

    I said no. Decades don't have a turn.

  3. Roman55's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: at the turn of the 60-s and 70-s of the XX century

    I am not a teacher.

    Firstly, we don't use 'turn' for decades, but if we did it wouldn't be the turn of the 60s and the 70s, it would be the turn of the 70s.

    Secondly, did E. Codd suggest his relational model continuously from the late 60s to the early 70s? If not, it doesn't make sense as it stands.

    There was presumably a date on which the suggestion was made, so why not just say, 'The progress achieved in the area of database technologies is particularly based on the relational model suggested by E. Codd in the early 1970s'?

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