Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Apr 2013
    • Posts: 276
    #1

    make him

    Can we make him cookies?
    Can we make cookies for him?

    Are both sentences correct? What is the difference in meaning? If they have similar meaning, then which is common in usage?

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #2

    Re: make him

    They're both correct, have no perceptible difference in meaning, and are both in common use. There is perhaps a difference in register: 'make <noun> for <person>' is slightly more formal.

    Here, though, we'd be more likely to make him biscuits.

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #3

    Re: make him

    With the first sentence there is a slight chance that some fatuous person will think you are going to transform him into cookies.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,822
    #4

    Re: make him

    I agree with the unlikely ambiguity about you transform him into cookies. I don't agree that "biscuits" is more likely in BrE. It's perfectly possible to say "Can we make him biscuits?" and "Can we make him cookies?" In BrE, they are different foods.

    To clear up any confusion, in BrE, these are biscuits:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	A-blue-biscuit-tin-with-a-008.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	34.7 KB 
ID:	2012



    In AmE, these are biscuits:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scones.jpg 
Views:	2 
Size:	77.0 KB 
ID:	2013




    In BrE, these are scones:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scones.jpg 
Views:	2 
Size:	77.0 KB 
ID:	2013



    In BrE, these are cookies:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	millies.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	21.6 KB 
ID:	2014

    Are you all more confused than you were before?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #5

    Re: make him

    Yeah. What makes a British cookie a cookie and not a biscuit?

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,822
    #6

    Re: make him

    I think it's something to do with the consistency. Cookies should be sort of soft and squishy, almost bendy, and can be bought hot from stalls where they're freshly cooked - with chocolate chip ones, the chocolate chips are melted. Biscuits tend to be hard, crunchy and, most importantly, can be dipped into tea! I admit there is some crossover but it's still possible to say "I'm making biscuits" and "I'm making cookies" and end up with completely different things that aren't interchangeable. They're certainly not interchangeable with the American versions.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #7

    Re: make him

    Those are all just different kinds of cookies here. Soft, warm and gooey is the best, of course.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,801
    #8

    Re: make him

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I agree with the unlikely ambiguity about you transform him into cookies.
    The wizards asked in unison, 'Can we make him cookies?'
    Is it likely to cause ambiguity?
    Not a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,453
    #9

    Re: make him

    Quote Originally Posted by shibli.aftab View Post
    Can we make him cookies?
    Note that 'him' is the indirect object of the sentence and 'cookies' is the direct object.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 24-Dec-2014 at 18:52.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #10

    Re: make him

    Matthew, I see no ambiguity in the original sentence. For it to mean "transform him into cookies", it would have to be "make him into cookies".

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-Oct-2014, 00:48
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 15-Jul-2013, 23:35
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-May-2011, 16:49
  4. can you add tranitions words to make it make sense?
    By julie_loc in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Mar-2011, 03:21
  5. [General] venture/maake bold/undestand/make out/alter/make over/make for
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-Apr-2010, 08:37

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •