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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 1,587
    #1

    a/the

    I have a book. The book is about physics.

    To call a noun known or unknown (to put a/an OR the before it), I believe in this statement: an unknown object is something that the speaker knows but the audience does not. And a known object is something that both the speaker and the audience know.
    First I wanted to know whether I'm right in finding it in my definition?

    It's a test I found in 'Digest,' a grammar book I'm teaching in a class now.

    Can you lend me .... pencil so that I can finish ..... test?
    the answer is "a-the" but I think "a-a" can be correct too, am I right?

    Thanks,

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,452
    #2

    Re: a/the

    Yes, you are right in both cases.

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