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    #1

    Question 'd?

    What does 'd mean in this sentence "He'd still have the gun"



    Thank You

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #2

    Re: 'd?

    She would still have the gun.

    -d has two forms: would and had. If "had", then look for a past participle, like this,

    EX: She'd been there before. => She had been there before.

    Be careful, though. If you see "have" + past participle, then -d represents "would", never "had".

    EX: She'd have been there before. => She would have been there before.

    There isn't a verb form had have in English.

    EX: She'd still have been there. <grammatical: would have>
    EX: She'd still have been there. <ungrammatical: had have>

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: 'd?

    thank You,


    how about "who'd can lend us money?"

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #4

    Re: 'd?

    EX: Who'd can lend us money?

    It's ungrammatical, kahhong. Remember that -d has two forms: had and would. Let's try them out:

    [1] Who had can lend us money?
    => ungrammatical. There are two auxiliary verbs, had and can.

    [2] Who would can lend us money?
    => ungrammatical. There are two auxiliary verbs, would and can.

    Try,

    Who'd be able to lend us money?
    Who would be able to lend us money?
    => grammatical. "would" takes a non-finite verb as its object; e.g., would send, would go, would find, would say, would speak, would want, ect.

    Note, "can" is not a non-finite verb. That's why "would can" doesn't work, and "would be" does work. "can" is synonymous with "be able", but the two differ in verb class. "can" is a modal.

    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by Casiopea; 08-May-2006 at 02:39.

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