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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    Hindi language

    Hi guys,

    Please check. Can we say "Hindi language has got impured because of the involvement of so many Urdu, Persian and English words. There are so many words that we do not know the hindi meaning of"?
    Last edited by tufguy; 02-Jan-2015 at 06:05.

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    #2

    Re: Hindi language

    1. Have you checked that "impured" is a word (either as an adjective or a past participle)?
    2. Why have you not capitalised any of the languages?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Hindi language

    Please read this from Wikipedia, tufguy.
    History

    Further information: History of Hindustani
    The dialect of Hindustani on which Standard Hindi is based is Khariboli, the vernacular of Delhi and the surrounding western Uttar Pradesh and southern Uttarakhand . This dialect acquired linguistic prestige in the Mughal Empire (1600s) and became known as Urdu, "the language of the court". In the late 19th century, the movement standardising a written language from Khariboli, for the Indian masses in North India, started to standardise Hindi as a separate language from Urdu, which was learnt by the elite. In 1881 Bihar accepted Hindi as its sole official language, replacing Urdu, and thus became the first state of India to adopt Hindi.
    After independence, the government of India instituted the following conventions:[original research?]

    • standardisation of grammar: In 1954, the Government of India set up a committee to prepare a grammar of Hindi; The committee's report was released in 1958 as "A Basic Grammar of Modern Hindi"
    • standardisation of the orthography, using the Devanagari script, by the Central Hindi Directorate of the Ministry of Education and Culture to bring about uniformity in writing, to improve the shape of some Devanagari characters, and introducing diacritics to express sounds from other languages.

    The Constituent Assembly adopted Hindi as the Official Language of the Union on 14 September 1949. Hence, it is celebrated as Hindi Day.
    Comparison with Modern Standard Urdu

    See also: Hindi–Urdu controversy, Hindustani phonology and Hindustani grammar
    Linguistically, Hindi and Urdu are the same language. Hindi is written in the Devanagari script and uses more Sanskrit words, whereas Urdu is written in the Persian script and uses more Persian words.Hindi and Urdu speakers 99% understand each other when talking.

  4. Key Member
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    #4

    Re: Hindi language

    Yes I checked "Impured" is the past participle of impure. What about my parahgraph?
    Last edited by tufguy; 02-Jan-2015 at 06:24.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Hindi language

    The only listing I have found for "impure" as a verb marked it as archaic.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Hindi language

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    Yes, I checked that "impured" is the past participle of impure. What about my parahgraph paragraph?
    I couldn't even find the archaic listing that Mike mentioned. We don't use "impure" like that any more - it is used pretty much exclusively as an adjective. Try to rewrite your sentence using a different verb/phrase and remember, this time, to capitalise the names of all the languages.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Hindi language

    I found it in Webster's Third.

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    #8

    Re: Hindi language

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    Can we say "Hindi language has got impured because of the involvement of so many Urdu, Persian and English words. There are so many words that we do not know the hindi meaning of"?
    No we can't- it needs a complete re-write. Also, words borrowed from other languages are called loan words.

  8. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Hindi language

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    Hindi language has got impured because of the involvement of so many Urdu, Persian and English words.
    Can it be rewritten as 'The Hindi language has got mixed with many Urdu, Persian and English words'?

    Not a teacher.

  9. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Hindi language

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Please read this from Wikipedia, tufguy.
    History

    Further information: History of Hindustani
    The dialect of Hindustani on which Standard Hindi is based is Khariboli, the vernacular of Delhi and the surrounding western Uttar Pradesh and southern Uttarakhand . This dialect acquired linguistic prestige in the Mughal Empire (1600s) and became known as Urdu, "the language of the court". In the late 19th century, the movement standardising a written language from Khariboli, for the Indian masses in North India, started to standardise Hindi as a separate language from Urdu, which was learnt by the elite. In 1881 Bihar accepted Hindi as its sole official language, replacing Urdu, and thus became the first state of India to adopt Hindi.
    After independence, the government of India instituted the following conventions:[original research?]

    • standardisation of grammar: In 1954, the Government of India set up a committee to prepare a grammar of Hindi; The committee's report was released in 1958 as "A Basic Grammar of Modern Hindi"
    • standardisation of the orthography, using the Devanagari script, by the Central Hindi Directorate of the Ministry of Education and Culture to bring about uniformity in writing, to improve the shape of some Devanagari characters, and introducing diacritics to express sounds from other languages.

    The Constituent Assembly adopted Hindi as the Official Language of the Union on 14 September 1949. Hence, it is celebrated as Hindi Day.
    Comparison with Modern Standard Urdu

    See also: Hindi–Urdu controversy, Hindustani phonology and Hindustani grammar
    Linguistically, Hindi and Urdu are the same language. Hindi is written in the Devanagari script and uses more Sanskrit words, whereas Urdu is written in the Persian script and uses more Persian words.Hindi and Urdu speakers 99% understand each other when talking.
    I once saw a lovely film, (I wish I knew the title), in Urdu with English subtitles: it was about an Urdu language poet, a celebrity, and he kept having poetry meetings in his living room with other men; his wife was a former singer, though they tried to hide the fact, and kept bringing them large plates of food as they composed verse. Hopefully someone here will know the one I mean.

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