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    #1

    I was riding a car.

    I was riding a bus.

    Can we say the same about cars ( I was on the passenger seat) ? I was riding a car.

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    #2

    Re: I was riding a car.

    I wouldn't say 'I was riding a bus'.

    I'd say 'I was riding in a bus/in a car'.

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    #3

    Re: I was riding a car.

    If we use it in the past simple,then it should be:
    I rode a bus (without any preposition) / I rode in a car ?
    Last edited by Arctica1982; 03-Jan-2015 at 12:10.

  1. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I was riding a car.

    I seem to recall that North Americans do tend to talk about "riding" buses. I don't think one can become a fully-fledged Blues Singer until one has ridden a Greyhound Bus somewhere...

    PS: They also ride trains. Must be the Cowboy in them.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: I was riding a car.

    We do ride buses and trains.
    We also take buses and trains.
    And we have no problem with riding in them, too.

    However, "riding a car" sound like you're standing on the roof riding it like a surfboard.

    (If you surf, do you "ride the wave" in the UK?)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Roman55's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: I was riding a car.

    I am not a teacher.

    Since 'to ride' means to sit on and control something, a surfer does ride a wave, just as one would ride a bike.

    Also, I suppose you could 'ride a car' if it's a railway carriage.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: I was riding a car.

    It doesn't mean 'and control something' here.
    Do you "ride the rollercoaster"?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: I was riding a car.

    We rarely use "ride" for anything except bicycles, motorbikes and horses.

    I go on a rollercoaster.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: I was riding a car.

    We'd say "Have you ridden Millennium at Cedar Point?" for roller coasters.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: I was riding a car.

    And we'd say "Have you ever been on Nemesis at Alton Towers?"

    I really want to go on Nemesis.
    Shall we go on Nemesis?
    I wanted to go on Nemesis but the queue was too long.
    We went on The Twister and then we went on Nemesis.
    Hurrah! I've finally been on Nemesis!

    I have no idea why we don't say "I've finally gone on Nemesis". It's the only tense where we suddenly use "to be", not "to go". Hmmmmm.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 04-Jan-2015 at 13:56.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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