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    #1

    The toilet pump is broken. It can't be used anymore.

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    The toilet pump is broken. It can't be used anymore.

    How to say the red rubber part has a slit/crack.
    Does the highlighted sentence make sense?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The toilet pump is broken. It can't be used anymore.

    It's called a toilet plunger.
    I don't know what the rubber part is called. I'd just say "it has a crack in it."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: The toilet pump is broken. It can't be used anymore.

    It is a rubber plunger.
    The pumping action clears blockage from the toilet pipes. A pump is a mechanically operated equipment.

    Not a teacher

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The toilet pump is broken. It can't be used anymore.

    I would say "The plunger is broken. There's a crack in the rubber bit". Most people in the UK call it a sink plunger but I have heard it referred to as a toilet plunger too.

    Edit: Wikipedia state that a sink plunger and a toilet plunger are not the same thing. See here.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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