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    #1

    joining commas

    I have just read that a joining comma (a connecting word such as and, or, but, while, and yet with an apostrophe in front) should not be used for other than to join two compete sentences together. Could anybody tell me if the following clause (beginning with and and ending with faction), intended as a weak interruption, is acceptable?

    "Yeah, because with there, presently, an acknowledgement of where chemist shop and some lunatic parallel association inevitable, it was through one such dispensing, and when in relation to a certain marganalized faction, points of some commonality did feature me, some days back."

    I'm sorry if that sounds convoluted.... However, from just now looking at the sentence italicised I'm inclined to think I can view that comma before and the one immediately following faction as a pair of gapping commas. Can I do that to the extent of no longer having to view the first as a joining comma?

    All the best,

    Red an' Dead
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 10-Jan-2015 at 10:37. Reason: Separated paragraphs and sorted out formatting

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    #2

    Re: joining commas

    Who is torturing you by making you subclassify your commas?

    That sentence is horrible and I have no idea what it is talking about. But it's not because a "joining comma" was used as a "gapping comma" or vice versa or whatever. It's because it seems to be an aggregation of clauses and phrases with no apparent center.

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    #3

    Re: joining commas

    Hello SoothingDave,

    sorry but I do beg to differ with your analysis. I'll try to keep it as simple as I can. I was for amusments sake thinking about the different meanings or associations a word can have. For example groom, which can be about anything from someone about to be married, or how they go about combing their hair. Hence with chemist shop and some parallel lunatic association. In other words as somewhere that dispenses medicines, the same time as it would cater for desperate junkies there to cash scripts to feed their habits. Thats as much as needs saying I think, and maybe the rest can be worked out without any help from me. Whether badly written or not isn't the issue:so far as it makes sense, which I believe it does.

    All the best,

    Red an' Dead

    It's a mute point, but the full quotation should include the words some years back, as opposed to days.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 10-Jan-2015 at 10:38. Reason: Sorted out formatting again

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: joining commas

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Who is torturing you by making you subclassify your commas?
    Not
    only are we learning things about commas we've never heard of before,
    but
    we are learning new ways to punctuate sentences.
    And
    it doesn't matter if something is badly written or
    not
    as long as there are no gapping commas.
    However,
    plunging necklines are things we should
    definitely
    look out for.
    Hm.

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: joining commas

    Quote Originally Posted by red an' dead View Post
    Hello SoothingDave,

    sorry but I do beg to differ with your analysis. I'll try to keep it as simple as I can. I was for amusments sake thinking about the different meanings or associations a word can have. For example groom, which can be about anything from someone about to be married, or how they go about combing their hair. Hence with chemist shop and some parallel lunatic association. In other words as somewhere that dispenses medicines, the same time as it would cater for desperate junkies there to cash scripts to feed their habits. Thats as much as needs saying I think, and maybe the rest can be worked out without any help from me. Whether badly written or not isn't the issue:so far as it makes sense,
    which I believe it does.

    All the best,

    Red an' Dead

    It's a mute point, but the full quotation should include the words some years back, as opposed to days.
    I'm sorry "red an' dead", but I have to agree with SoothingDave. Your sentence is completely unintelligible. For example, "Yeah, because with there, presently, an acknowledgement of where chemist shop and some lunatic parallel association inevitable" is just a jumble of totally unrelated words and phrases which, together, have no meaning.
    And, by the way, it's a called a "moot" point; not a "mute" point.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 10-Jan-2015 at 10:38. Reason: Fixed formatting in quote
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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    #6

    Re: joining commas

    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
    I'm sorry "red an' dead", but I have to agree with SoothingDave. Your sentence is completely unintelligible. For example, "Yeah, because with there, presently, an acknowledgement of where chemist shop and some lunatic parallel association inevitable" is just a jumble of totally unrelated words and phrases which, together, have no meaning.
    And, by the way, it's a called a "moot" point; not a "mute" point.
    Moot's good. All the best.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: joining commas

    Red an' dead, are you sure you are a native English speaker who is British?
    Last edited by MikeNewYork; 10-Jan-2015 at 10:28.

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    #8

    Re: joining commas

    Was Thomas Carlyle one of the same who was?
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Red an' dead", are you sure you are a native English speaker who is British?
    Have you read him? No offence, but I doubt it.
    By the way, what's the single pair of double quotation marks at the end of my moniker supposed to mean? I'd like to know the answer to that (if there is one?)
    Last edited by red an' dead; 10-Jan-2015 at 10:28.

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    #9

    Re: joining commas

    That was a typo. Why is your question mark inside the parentheses? Does Carlyle punctuate as badly as you did in your posts?

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    #10

    Re: joining commas

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    That was a typo. Why is your question mark inside the parentheses? Does Carlyle punctuate as badly as you did in your posts?
    That question mark shouldn't be there at all. "I'd like to know the answer to that (if there is one)" isn't a question.

    I'm a late joiner to this thread. I wish I'd stayed in bed. That original sentence is incomprehensible nonsense, with or without commas. I think the writer might have been taking advantage of some of those desperate junkies' prescriptions!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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