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  1. Newbie
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jan 2015
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    Post "Thank you for your email." Vs. "Thanks for your email."

    To start with, let me give you a short introduction of mine. I am 33 years old guy who is conversing in English language primarily for business purpose. I have been writing business emails on/off for more than 10+ years, I've this habit to check my email thoroughly for any grammatical and spelling mistakes before I send it across.

    Today, I have been in a training session and was bit surprised with my trainer statement on "thanks". As per my trainer, he said that "Thanks for your email" is a grammatically incorrect sentence as "thanks" stands for plural entity and if you're addressing to any specific person, it would be incorrect. In past, I'd been dealing with Americans/Canadian people and I never seen anyone questioning on this specific phrase. Westerner people are more through in email content and believe that someone would have replied back to me on this, if this were incorrect.

    To my utter surprise, I'd put-up another question to my trainer that why people use "many thanks" and "thanks a ton" to which he said that there is nothing like "Many Thanks" and "thanks a ton" can't be quantified.

    His explanation seems a bit logical to me but my understanding is/was that "thanks for your email" is phrase rather than a sentence in itself.

    To expert, I would like to ask about the difference between "Thanks for your email" versus "Thank you for your email". Which is more appropriate and redefined to use in business email.

    Thank you/Thanks in advance.

    Manoj

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: "Thank you for your email." Vs. "Thanks for your email."

    I agree with you that "Thanks for your e-mail" is a phrase and not a sentence. Your trainer's objections about the plural nature of the phrase does not persuade me that it is grammatically incorrect. My only objection to "Thanks for the e-mail" is that it is a bit informal in a business setting.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #3

    Re: "Thank you for your email." Vs. "Thanks for your email."

    Your trainer is wrong.

    "Thanks" is, as Mike says, more informal than "thank you" but not at all incorrect.

    Once you have a friendly relationship with the person you are emailing, "thanks a bunch" is also fine.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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