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    #1

    treacle, molasses and syrup

    How do you distinguish these words? The Cambridge describe all these as "sweet and thick". and two of which as "dark". So is it means the next time I encounter a sweet and thick substance, if it is limpid, it is syrup, if it is not so dark, it is treacle, if it is very dark, it is molasses?

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: treacle, molasses and syrup

    As far as I know the word treacle never appears in AmE. I think that treacle (BrE) and molasses (Ame) are the same thing, a dark brown thick liquid that is made when sugar cane is converted into sugar.

    Syrups are sweet liquid foods. So treacle and molasses are examples of syrups. A famous and delicious syrup made where I live is maple syrup. But many other syrups are made from various fruits, sugar and water.
    Last edited by probus; 16-Jan-2015 at 05:07.

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