Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Moldavian
      • Home Country:
      • Moldova
      • Current Location:
      • Moldova

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 75
    #1

    I have been working this week.

    Hello!

    The books say that the present perfect continous is also used for recent actions. The signal words are: this day, all day, this week...

    An example would be: I have been working this week.

    Does the meaning change if I use the simple form of the present perfect ?

    I have worked this week.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,829
    #2

    Re: I have been working this week.

    There is no need for the present perfect in that sentence but it's not ungrammatical.

    I worked this week.
    I worked [for] 40 hours this week.
    I have worked this week.
    I have worked [for] 40 hours this week.

    I don't know how it works in AmE, but if you said "I worked 40 hours this week" on a Saturday, it would refer to the five days leading up to Saturday (Monday to Friday). Some people refer to that as "last week".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #3

    Re: I have been working this week.

    It works the same in AmE.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Moldavian
      • Home Country:
      • Moldova
      • Current Location:
      • Moldova

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 75
    #4

    Re: I have been working this week.

    Hello! I see.

    I am just trying to understand what the English books are trying to teach us.
    This is a small summary of my knowledge about the present perfect continous, I think this will make it easier for you to help and identify what I haven't understood yet.

    1. Present perfect continous can be used with "for" and "since". It means the action started in the past and continues to the present.

    I have been waiting for 3 hours. I have been waiting since 2.30.

    2. It can be used without "for" and "since", in case we see the result of the action now.

    He is hot beacuse he has been running.

    3. It can be used for the actions that happened recently.

    A question such as "Have you been smoking?" can suggest that you smell the smoke on the person. Using this tense in a question suggests you can see, smell, hear or feel the results of the action. It is possible to insult someone by using this tense incorrectly.

    3.a I can't understand the usage below:

    In the book I am learning from (this is not homework) there is an exercise:

    The task:

    Read the XYZ diary. Work with a partner. One of you is XYZ. It's Friday evening and you have phoned your friend for a chat.
    Ask: What have you been doing?

    The XYZ' diary:

    Monday: Had lunch with Barbara. She didn't get the job. Worked late.
    Tuesday: Work is crazy at the moment, no lunch .Went for a drink with Fiona. Brother rang, we argued.
    Wednesday: I got the payrise I wanted. Bad news - I had to work until 8 o'clock again.

    As far as I understand I have to ask questions like: What have you been doing? this would mean recently.

    Recently means 1 day,2 days,1 week ago...?.
    What is the time limit in the past for recently ?
    When using "this week" can we use present perfect continous?

    Ems in the post number 2 suggested that we can use past simple or present perfect simple (it's not ungrammatical).

    Is it a mistake if we use the continous form of the present perfect with "this week" What have you been doing this week?
    Last edited by Arctica1982; 21-Jan-2015 at 21:11.

  3. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,309
    #5

    Re: I have been working this week.

    I am not a teacher.

    Your understanding, as outlined in points 1, 2, and 3, is correct.

    As for the task, I would say this. If the premise is that you phone your friend for a chat, I would infer that you are in regular contact. In the course of a conversation, 'What have you been doing?' would mean 'What have you been doing since the last time we spoke?'

    You could, of course, also say 'What have you done today?' or, 'What did you do yesterday?'

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Moldavian
      • Home Country:
      • Moldova
      • Current Location:
      • Moldova

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 75
    #6

    Re: I have been working this week.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    Your understanding, as outlined in points 1, 2, and 3, is correct.

    As for the task, I would say this. If the premise is that you phone your friend for a chat, I would infer that you are in regular contact. In the course of a conversation, 'What have you been doing?' would mean 'What have you been doing since the last time we spoke?'

    You could, of course, also say 'What have you done today?' or, 'What did you do yesterday?'
    I understand.

    1. If reffering to the exercise about the diary: What would be the answers to the question: What have you been doing?
    I have been having lunch, I have been working late, I have been arguing.....?
    2. In case the last meeting or conversation was last week, then we can ask: What have you been doing this week?
    3. Is there a difference between : I have worked today / I have been working today?
    Last edited by Arctica1982; 21-Jan-2015 at 17:16.

  4. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,309
    #7

    Re: I have been working this week.

    I am not a teacher.

    1. The question, 'What have you been doing?' if covering a period of several days means, 'What have you been doing with yourself?' or, 'What have you been up to?' We would tend to say something like, 'Oh, you know, this and that, nothing special. Apart from work I did go to the cinema the other day…'

    2. Yes.

    3. 'I have been working (today)' would be the natural answer to the question, 'What have you been doing today?'
    'I have worked today' just doesn't sound right, and would only be natural as an answer to a different question, such as, 'What have you done today?'
    It is grammatically correct, but unnatural IMO.

  5. euncu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,314
    #8

    Re: I have been working this week.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    There is no need for the present perfect in that sentence but it's not ungrammatical.

    I worked this week.
    I worked [for] 40 hours this week.
    I have worked this week.
    I have worked [for] 40 hours this week.

    I don't know how it works in AmE, but if you said "I worked 40 hours this week" on a Saturday, it would refer to the five days leading up to Saturday (Monday to Friday). Some people refer to that as "last week".
    Hello,

    In my opinion, the present perfect tense is one of the most confusing aspect of the English Language for the learners. And with your answer I' m confused again.

    To my knowledge, if the week is not over I should say " I have worked this week" and if it is over then I should say "I worked last week".

    Answers from all the teachers are welcomed and thanks for the answers in advance.
    ***Neither a teacher nor a native-speaker***

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 6,039
    #9

    Re: I have been working this week.

    Recently means 1 day,2 days,1 week ago...?.
    What is the time limit in the past for recently ?
    Probably that's where your uncertainty comes from, if I may. "Recently" means "recently" likewise "two days ago" would mean "two days ago". It may sound a bit subjective but to a greater extent, the tense form depends on how the speaker sees a certain time period rather than how this time period can be physically measured.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Moldavian
      • Home Country:
      • Moldova
      • Current Location:
      • Moldova

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 75
    #10

    Re: I have been working this week.

    I only agree with Roman's answers. They are clear and correct.
    Last edited by Arctica1982; 22-Jan-2015 at 04:43.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-Dec-2014, 23:52
  2. 'most time of the week' or 'most of the week'?
    By xupeng66 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Mar-2014, 22:06
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 17-Jul-2011, 18:44
  4. [Grammar] Can I omit the word "working" from the "working experience"?
    By kwfine in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-Oct-2009, 05:32
  5. hard working/ working hard/ hard work
    By Nefertiti in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-Apr-2008, 13:48

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •