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    #1

    in case you didn't get that

    What does it mean "in case you didn't get that" in the following context:

    "Maybe that's not his fault. Monday he goes on trial, in case you didn't get that. You don't talk about going to jail."

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in case you didn't get that

    Quote Originally Posted by kompstar View Post
    What does it mean "in case you didn't get that" mean in the following context:

    "Maybe that's not his fault. Monday he goes on trial, in case you didn't get that. You don't talk about going to jail."
    Can I assume that you know what "in case" means? The rest of it means "you didn't understand that he goes on trial on Monday".

    So it means "Just in case you hadn't already heard/worked out that he is going on trial on Monday, I'm telling you that he's going on trial on Monday".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: in case you didn't get that

    Is „Monday he goes on trial, in case you didn't get that” correct?
    and maybe it should be: “On Monday he goes on trial, in case you didn't get that”?
    Last edited by kompstar; 21-Jan-2015 at 07:46. Reason: mistake

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in case you didn't get that

    In a formal or exam situation, yes, we say "On Monday ...". However, in speech, people don't always use full grammatical sentences.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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