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    #1

    bring a book to/for me

    He brought me a book. = He brought a book ___ me.

    Which preposition should I fill in, for or to?
    I need native speakers' help.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: bring a book to/for me

    Either one.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: bring a book to/for me

    They are both possible for grammatical sentences. For your context, "to" is correct and unambiguous. "For" is possible but it could mean that he brought a book to someone else and said "This is for Sitifan".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: bring a book to/for me

    He read me a poem. = He read a poem ___ me.

    Which preposition should I fill in, for or to?
    I need native speakers' help.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: bring a book to/for me

    The same answer applies.

    He read a poem to me = We were in a room together (or on the phone/Skype) and he read a poem aloud and I was the listener.
    He read a poem for me = He read a poem aloud for my benefit (same situation as above) OR I was supposed to read a poem but I couldn't/didn't want to so he read it on my behalf.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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