Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Dec 2012
    • Posts: 8
    #1

    At a short notice

    What does 'at a short notice' mean?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 6,039
    #2

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 2,013
    #3

    Re: At a short notice

    Note that this phrase doesn't require the indefinite article. It's "at/on short notice".

  1. Alex S's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2015
    • Posts: 28
    #4

    Re: At a short notice

    I always have a problem with a/the... Saw the variant when "a" was used for this idiom, but i can see now it was wrong.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 6,039
    #5

    Re: At a short notice

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex S View Post
    I always have a problem with a/the... Saw the variant when "a" was used for this idiom, but i can see now it was wrong.
    Once I found it helpful to examine an idiom more closely to tie its meaning up with any grammar issues. The word notice is uncoutable here and implies rather time before the speaker is going to do sth than a real note or message. But how come you, a native speaker of English, have difficulty in using a/the?! I was taught to believe native speakers have a feel for artices.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: At a short notice

    Quote Originally Posted by BusinessEnglish101 View Post
    It means asking for something right before you need it.
    In other words, if you need it quickly and you just decide to call someone and let them know about it.

    You can use this in business settings. For example, your boss can say:
    hey, thank you for finishing the project on such a short notice.
    See the corrections above.

    MNY
    Last edited by Barb_D; 22-Mar-2015 at 13:22.

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 3,564
    #7

    Re: At a short notice

    Quickly, with little time to prepare.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Belgium

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 34
    #8

    Re: At a short notice

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Quickly, with little time to prepare.

    An example:

    Romance at short notice was her specialty.

    She was good at making up stories off the cuff
    English is not my native tongue, please donít slap me when something that I wrote sounds wrong.
    It makes me crawl into a corner and stay there, in fetus position, for at least a week.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 2,013
    #9

    Re: At a short notice

    not a teacher

    An example:
    Romance at short notice was her specialty.
    She was good at making up stories off the cuff.


    Your example does not suggest to me the meaning you give it.

    My first thought is that it's a way of saying that she makes herself available for romantic liaisons of some sort without requiring much in the way of preliminaries.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Belgium

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 34
    #10

    Re: At a short notice

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    not a teacher

    An example:
    Romance at short notice was her specialty.
    She was good at making up stories off the cuff.


    Your example does not suggest to me the meaning you give it.

    My first thought is that it's a way of saying that she makes herself available for romantic liaisons of some sort without requiring much in the way of preliminaries.
    I beg to differ

    I wouldn't have had the nerve to put this example here if we hadn't have had the same discussion 50 years ago at school.

    Edit: 'Hadn't have had' or 'hadn't had' ... I'm in doubt ?

    http://www.answers.com/Q/What_is_the...he_open_window
    http://arts-literature.blurtit.com/4...ort-notice-was
    Last edited by Mahi93; 02-Apr-2015 at 21:01.
    English is not my native tongue, please donít slap me when something that I wrote sounds wrong.
    It makes me crawl into a corner and stay there, in fetus position, for at least a week.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 24-Jul-2014, 07:41
  2. short notice
    By thomas615 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-Dec-2013, 02:23
  3. [Idiom] Last minute notice vs short notice
    By MarieLina in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 25-May-2011, 09:15
  4. short notice
    By jctgf in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 29-Jun-2008, 18:19
  5. Romancing at short notice
    By Miner49'er in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Feb-2007, 17:08

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •