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    #1

    Grammar-Concrete

    Kindly check the below sentence for any grammatical error.

    I have found some invoices for trial mix concrete (50 Cum) from supplier for the month of April 2014. Trial mix concretes are usually supplied at free of cost in the beginning of the project.
    Last edited by Kumar Nadimuthu; 24-Jan-2015 at 08:55.

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    #2

    Re: Grammar-Concrete

    not a teacher


    I have found some invoices for trial mix concrete (50 Cum) from supplier for the month of April 2014. Trial mix concretes are usually supplied at free of cost in the beginning of the project.

    I assume you are particularly concerned with the bold part of your text, however I feel the first section needs some attention too.
    Here's how I think it should read, with my suggestions in bold.

    I have found some invoices for trial mix concrete (50 cum) from the supplier for the month of April 2014. Trial mix concrete is usually supplied free of charge at the beginning of the project.
    or…
    … supplied at no cost at the beginning of the project.

    I'm not sure how you usually write the short form for cubic metres in your own business, but it seems to me that it's normally all in lower case: cum. I'll leave that up to you.

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    #3

    Re: Grammar-Concrete

    Concrete is measured in cubic metre, abbreviated to cu.m. or m3.

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    #4

    Re: Grammar-Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    Concrete is measured in cubic metre, abbreviated to cu.m. or m3.
    That's true, but it's also very commonly written as "cum" on the websites of concrete-related businesses. Other variations to be found are cum., Cum, CUM etc.

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    #5

    Re: Grammar-Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    That's true, but it's also very commonly written as "cum" on the websites of concrete-related businesses. Other variations to be found are cum., Cum, CUM etc.
    Well, I am in the construction line and I have not seen the unit expressed as cum.
    It is more commonly written as m3 (metre cube)
    There is an example here: http://www.diydata.com/general_build...lculator_m.php

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    #6

    Re: Grammar-Concrete

    I don't think we have any disagreement over what is the standard abbreviation, tedmc.

    Before answering the OP's question I quickly searched for instances of other forms of abbreviation in general use that are similar to the OP's. I found many examples on the sites of firms dealing in concrete and concrete handling machinery, in various regions. Significantly, a lot of them are in India, the OP's home country. For example, this company's website starts off using m3 but further down the page it changes to cum, and then seems to use them interchangeably, with the occasional Cum.
    http://www.gamzenmachines.com/batching-plant.html

    In 2014 The Malaysian Reserve reported online that a new concrete batching plant in Kuala Lumpur "…is capable of producing 200 cum of concrete per hour".
    http://themalaysianreserve.com/main/...n-kuala-lumpur

    My point to the OP was that if he and his suppliers used a certain abbreviation that was common and well understood in his region (which does appear to be the case), then I wasn't suggesting that he needed to change his text.
    Last edited by JMurray; 25-Jan-2015 at 04:46. Reason: typo

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    #7

    Re: Grammar-Concrete

    I am well aware about cum or m

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    #8

    Re: Grammar-Concrete

    Quote Originally Posted by Kumar Nadimuthu View Post
    I am well aware about of cum or m.
    Presumably you are also aware that "cum" and "m" are completely different measurements.

    All users should be aware that on many websites, trying to post the word "cum" would result in the word being deleted or even your account being limited. It's a bit early on a Sunday morning for this, but to make it clear, it is a slang word for "ejaculated semen".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: Grammar-Concrete



    The above(penultimate) is my incomplete post. I am well aware about
    ​cum or
    m3 as I also belongs to construction industry. Units should not be written in capital. Concretes will be expired if not unloaded within 90 minutes from the time of dispatch. Trial mixes are usually conducted to observe workability and compressive strength of concrete. Suppliers are wholly responsible to prove their quality of concrete within the client specification prior to use of any concrete structures. Usually these items are non payable. In the road, concrete truck shall be treated as an ambulance due to its time limit, Otherwise suppler would have lose $1000 per truck.


    Last edited by Kumar Nadimuthu; 25-Jan-2015 at 18:01.

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    #10

    Re: Grammar-Concrete

    Concrete is a perishable material if not unloaded within 90 minutes from the time of dispatch.
    'Perishable' is only used with food.
    Concrete is a time-sensitive material which must be poured into formwork within 90 minutes of mixing, or it would harden and cannot be used.

    not a teacher

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