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    #1

    In order to / To

    "In order to " can be replace with "To"? Please explain to me with more examples, where exactly it to be used?


    1. In order to renew my passport, I was in the queue at Embassy for past 3 hours.

    2. In order to oversleep on Sunday, I did not set the alarm clock.


    I felt that I can also reorder above sentences as below.

    Option 1: I was in the queue at Embassy for past 3 hours to renew my passport.

    Option 2: To renew my passport, I was in the queue at Embassy for past 3 hours.
    Last edited by Kumar Nadimuthu; 26-Jan-2015 at 18:06.

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: In order to / To

    Quote Originally Posted by Kumar Nadimuthu View Post
    "In order to " can be replace with "To"? Please explain to me with more examples, where exactly should it be used?


    1. In order to renew my passport, I was in the queue at the embassy for past 3 hours.

    2. I wanted to sleep in on Sunday, so I did not set the alarm clock.


    I feel that I can also reorder above sentences as below.

    Option 1: I was in the queue at the embassy for the past 3 hours to renew my passport.

    Option 2: To renew my passport, I was in the queue at embassy for past 3 hours.
    Note that the word "embassy" is not a proper noun. However, you might say American Embassy or British Embassy (to name two examples.)


  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: In order to / To

    Note that Americans would more likely say that they stood in line rather than that they were in the queue.

  3. Roman55's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: In order to / To

    That's funny. I was just about to congratulate you on correcting the spelling of the word queue without mentioning the 'line'.

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: In order to / To

    Kumar, please note that we would not say we wanted to oversleep so we didn't turn on the alarm clock. It is basic to the meaning of the word "oversleep" that it is something we didn't mean to do. (It should be helpful to know that the prefix "over" means too much of something.)


  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: In order to / To

    So that I could have a lie-in/so that I could sleep in, I didn't set an alarm. (On purpose)
    I forgot to set an alarm so I overslept. (Accidental)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: In order to / To

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Kumar:

    1. "Many young people throughout the world are studying English to improve their employment opportunities in this global economy."

    2. "Many young people throughout the world are studying English in order to improve their employment opportunities in this global economy."

    I made up those sentences. I believe that they are correct.

    Adding the words "in order" introduces the infinitive "to improve."

    Since you are a learner, I strongly suggest that you always use "in order" (especially in speech) in order to help your listeners understand what you are telling them. As soon as a native speaker hears you say "in order," s/he will prepare him-, herself for a coming infinitive. If you do not use "in order," the infinitive may take your listener by surprise. Learners often have an accent. So it is important to do everything possible to help their listeners understand what is being said.

    P.S. Those sentences also have a very formal version: "Many young people throughout the world are studying English in order that they might improve their employment opportunities in this global economy." Source: The Grammar Book (1983 edition) by Mesdames Celce-Murcia and Larsen-Freeman. IMPORTANT: I also made up the third sentence. If it is bad, do NOT blame the two scholars. I wanted to credit them for the grammar that I used in my sentence.
    Last edited by TheParser; 26-Jan-2015 at 22:16. Reason: Added P.S.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: In order to / To

    James, of your first two sentences, I prefer the first. "In order to" adds nothing to the sentence except additional words. The infinitive "to improve" needs no introduction.

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