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    #1

    still/yet

    1) He still hasn't left.
    2) He hasn't left yet.
    3) He hasn't left still.

    I am not sure '3' is correct. Maybe it works in spoken English.

    It seems to me that '1' and '2' do not mean exactly the same. I think '2' just states a fact, but '1' seems to imply that he should have left already but has not.
    I think '3', if it is correct, would correspond to '1'.

    Would you say that is correct?

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

  1. Roman55's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: still/yet

    I am not a teacher.

    I agree with you about 1) and 2). I would not use 3) but perhaps some local dialects admit it.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: still/yet

    As fot 1 and 2, there could be a difference in meaning. As for 3, eh what?

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    #4

    Re: still/yet

    Thank you both very much.

    I still haven't made up my mind.
    and
    I haven't made up my mind yet.

    mean the same to me.

    I thought '1' would always imply that he should have left already. Thanks to Tarheel's reply, I realize there is some ambiguity there. Interesting. Thank you Tarheel.

    Maybe it is none of my business Roman, but as you are a native speaker, I don't think it is really necessary for you to mention that you are not a teacher. To me the views of a native speaker, and his or her acquired 'instincts', carry as much weight -if not more- as those of someone who has a teaching certificate.... Language is that kind of a thing...

    If you do it because that is a rule in this site, then I'd suggest that exception be made as regards native speakers such as you.

    I really appreciate your replies.

    Thanks.

  3. Roman55's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: still/yet

    I am not a teacher.

    Well, navi tasan, I thank you for your remarks, but the rules are the rules!

    As for your continued indecision about the original question, in my capacity as a native speaker -with all the regional/cultural/colloquial influences that that implies- I definitely feel that 'still' puts an emphasis on the ongoing nature of a situation, that 'yet' fails to convey.

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: still/yet

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    Thank you both very much.

    I still haven't made up my mind.
    and
    I haven't made up my mind yet.

    mean the same to me.
    Me too.

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    I thought '1' would always imply that he should have left already. Thanks to Tarheel's reply, I realize there is some ambiguity there. Interesting.
    I tend to agree with you (and Roman), but absent context we can't be 100% sure what is intended.

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    Maybe it is none of my business Roman, but as you are a native speaker, I don't think it is really necessary for you to mention that you are not a teacher. To me the views of a native speaker, and his or her acquired 'instincts', carry as much weight -if not more- as those of someone who has a teaching certificate.... Language is that kind of a thing...

    If you do it because that is a rule in this site, then I'd suggest that exception be made as regards native speakers such as you.

    I really appreciate your replies.

    Thanks.
    When I first started here as Tarheel somebody told me that I should put "Not a teacher" into every one of my replies. (Formerly, I was a moderator as RonBee.) I was okay with "Not a professional teacher" put into each of my posts if I could do that without typing it every time, but I didn't know how to do that, and nobody told me how. (If I don't have to do it I don't think Roman should have to either.) Anyhow, the whole point of getting on this forum is to put my brain to work helping people.

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