Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 4,573
    #1

    corporal punishment

    "Corporal punishment should be given to the children till 9th standard". Is it correct?

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 10,960
    #2

    Re: corporal punishment

    That is a grammatical sentence. (Does that answer your question?)

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,814
    #3

    Re: corporal punishment

    We don't use "9th standard" in English. Perhaps "Children should receive corporal punishment until Year 9/until 9th grade" would work. I assume you don't mean that all children should be given corporal punishment!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 10,960
    #4

    Re: corporal punishment

    Maybe they use that in India.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,592
    #5

    Re: corporal punishment

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Maybe they use that in India.
    They do use "standard". In India, "9th standard" is the correct term for it

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,814
    #6

    Re: corporal punishment

    That's a good fact to bear in mind. The OP needs to bear in mind that if they are speaking to a native speaker of a different variant of English, "9th standard" won't be immediately understood.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,451
    #7

    Re: corporal punishment

    Neither will 'Year 9' or '9th Grade'.

    State the actual age up to which you consider children should be beaten.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,814
    #8

    Re: corporal punishment

    Fair point. I would use the age.

    However, I discovered about a year ago that the terminology for school "years" in the UK seems to have changed and follows a similar system to AmE.

    When I went to school, I was in "5s, 6s, 7s, 8s" at "first school" (now called primary school), then I was in "1st year/2nd year/3rd year/4th year" at "middle school" (now called junior school and which now finishes at the age of 11, not 12), then in "2nd year/3rd year/4th year/5th year" at "secondary school/high school", then in "Lower 6th/Upper 6th" at Sixth Form College.

    None of those terms seem to have survived.

    My work colleague, who has an 11-year-old son, tells me that all schools now refer to their students as being in "Year 1" (age 5) all the way to "Year 11" (age 16). From 2017 (I think), all students will be required to stay at school until the age of 18 so presumably, they will enter "Year 12" and "Year 13" before they can leave school.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. Grumpy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 972
    #9

    Re: corporal punishment

    When I went to school, I was in "5s, 6s, 7s, 8s" at "first school" (now called primary school), then I was in "1st year/2nd year/3rd year/4th year" at "middle school" (now called junior school and which now finishes at the age of 11, not 12), then in "2nd year/3rd year/4th year/5th year" at "secondary school/high school", then in "Lower 6th/Upper 6th" at Sixth Form College.


    That's interesting. In mid 1950's Scotland, I went to "primary school" from age 5 to 11. The small village school had two classrooms only, so children of different ages were all taught together. The first three years were spent in "Infants", after which I moved classroom to be taught for the remaining years by the Headmaster (who happened to be my father). Then, having passed the "11 plus" (or "The Qualifying", as it was always called), I went on to "Senior Secondary" school, where I progressed from "1st year" to "6th year". Simples!
    We didn't have an "upper" 6th, as we sat our "Highers" a year before our English counterparts did their A-levels. "Highers" (Higher Scottish Certificate of Education, I think) ranked somewhere in between the old standard "O-levels" and A-levels. In fact, we could sit some of our "Highers" in 5th year. Scottish University courses were generally one year longer than their English equivalents, but the "Highers" system meant that we did not have to specialise to the same extent as A-level students. With a decent spread of "Highers" under my belt, I was eligible to apply for every single degree course offered by the Scottish Universities.
    Coming back to the thread, corporal punishment carried on to 4th year at least (age 14/15): administered across the palms of the hands by means of the famous "Lochgelly Belt" or "Tawse". Happy days!!
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 30-Jan-2015 at 16:49. Reason: Added quote box
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  9. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #10

    Re: corporal punishment

    When I went to primary school in Chicago, the school had kindergarten through grade 8. I went to kindergarten at age 4 and first grade at age 5. There were three classes in each grade, each with 40 students. So there were almost 1000 students. I graduated from 8th grade at 13. Then came high school.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] punishment and penalty
    By UM Chakma in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 17-Aug-2013, 07:52
  2. (the) capital punishment
    By nyota in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-Oct-2010, 18:11
  3. [Vocabulary] To mete out a punishment
    By Chocobosandwich in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 28-Feb-2010, 00:36
  4. Body punishment?
    By sky753 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-Apr-2009, 11:14
  5. Crime and Punishment
    By Tanja in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 24-Aug-2004, 17:56

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •