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  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #21

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    I am not surprised that you have ignored my posts. You can't weasel out of the sentence "Spot is a dog" with your theoretical nonsense. If that is a sentence, then "is" is a verb. If it is not a sentence, please tell me what it is. Based on your previous offerings, I am guessing that you think "dog" is an adverb there. I don't think you have the slightest understanding of English grammar.

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    #22

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    You really don't get it at all, do you?

    The English language has many different types of information that can be represented in a single sentence - the overall type of message can change depending on the different concepts it can contain. Using a single manner of use to represent different, disparate and unrelated concepts - (which you do not fully recognise and understand, yet) - that affect the overall meaning of such a message/sentence, is inconsistent with the the basic reason for recognising such different manners of use and concepts in the first place - and therefore the basic reason for the existence of language, aswell as its overall context - (semiosis) - (semantics/syntactics).

    Either the rules of language are consistent or they have no reason to exist. The reason we have problems is that we currently ignore the differences in order to make the teaching of the language simple, in a manner that is consistent with our overall, flawed, perception of it - which just makes it too simplistic, instead.

    The current sentence structure we use is inconsistent and therefore problematic, since it doesn't reflect the differences in meaning the language represents. Trying to say that it isn't, is just denying the problems we have, which you do not fully recognise or understand, either.

    EDIT: If you are telling me that the overall type of message is the same between:

    Spot is a dog
    Spot moved a dog

    Which it would have to be for is to be recognised as a verb, then you have serious problems.
    Last edited by DarrenTomlyn; 07-Feb-2015 at 01:12.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #23

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    I get it just fine. You can't figure out what a simple sentence is.

    You keep referring to the problems "we" have. It appears that you are the one having problems.

    Spot is a dog. Study it. It might help.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #24

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    "Spot is a dog" is a complete sentence with a meaning. "Spot moved a dog" has little meaning for me. The overall message is nowhere near the same. "Is" is indeed a verb. So is "moved". But "dog" is not an adverb.

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    #25

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    Perhaps you'd prefer: Spot moved the dog instead, but the structure is still the same, with the same inconsistencies.

    There are a number of basic relationships that matter for grammar (prepositions and determiners can be added as applicable, as can the words very/quite etc. as described in my post):

    noun/noun (or pronouns)
    noun/adjective
    noun/verb
    (noun)/verb/adverb
    (noun)/verb/adjective
    Noun/relative time or space
    (noun)/verb/relative time or space
    relative time or space/property of such (No current manners of use for this)

    The word IS can be used within and IN ADDITION to ALL of these manners of use, EXCEPT for verb/adjective and verb/adverb - THIS CANNOT BE TRUE if the word is was possibly part of the same concept that causes the use of verb itself, and if it's not, then it makes absolutely NO SENSE whatsoever to give it the same manner of use as any other concept.

    Since IS cannot be given a property that causes the use of adverb, it cannot be a verb. Since IS has no relationship to any and all other concepts derived from the basic concepts causing verbs and adverbs, it cannot be used as a verb - NONE OF WHICH ARE RECOGNISED CURRENTLY BECAUSE OF THE CONFUSION FOR SUCH A CONCEPT.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #26

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    LOL! And yet, "is" is still a verb whether or not you agree. You can either change reality to fit your "rules" or change your "rules" to fit reality. As you currently put out your rules, nobody of substance will buy them.

  7. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #27

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    Traditional grammar allows for be to go with certain types of adverbs. It is only by your reclassifying these as relative time or space that you create the situation where you say it cannot be a verb because it cannot go with an adverb. This introduces a certain circularity in the argument.

  8. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #28

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    Yes, the verb "is" is not always a linking verb. Sometimes it used to mean "presently exists". In that use, "is" can take an adverb.

    She is there now.
    She is in the park.
    He is in Cleveland.

    All of them answer the question "where", which is a cardinal sign of an adverb.

  9. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #29

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    DarrenTomlyn, your weird use of the word "cause" has turned me off. Apparently, Tdol and MikeNewYork have more than the average amount of patience.

  10. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #30

    Re: Problems with Verbs... (Part 3of my blog)

    For me, it is sport!

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