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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    A question concerning tenses

    Hello,

    I would like to ask you a questions concerning the use of tenses.

    Namely...I would like to express a statement (IN GENERAL) that a British politician (who normally lives in GB) wants to help his friends there.

    Would such a sentence be acceptable:

    While in Britain, he tries to help his friends.

    Thanks in advance for your help! :)

    Best regards,
    tom365

  2. Boris Richard's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A question concerning tenses

    In the context, the British politician wants to help his friends. It means that the British politician will help them in the future. In the other word, the British politician has not do the help yet, right? If that so, the sentence should have been "As long as the British politician is in Britain, he will try to help his friends".

    I'm not a teacher.
    Last edited by Boris Richard; 01-Feb-2015 at 13:45.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: A question concerning tenses

    If they are repeated actions in the past, the present and the future, i.e. he regularly does so, I would use the simple present.
    'When the British politician is in Britain, he often tries to help his friends.'

    Not a teacher.

  4. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: A question concerning tenses

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Richard View Post
    In the context, the British politician wants to help his friends. It means that the British politician will help them in the future. In the other word, the British politician has not do the help yet, right? If that so, the sentence should have been "As long as the British politician is in Britain, he will try to help his friends".

    I'm not a teacher.
    Hi, no...I expressed myself in a wrong way. He has already helped them and it is a regular action - he helps them during his stay in Britain.

  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: A question concerning tenses

    Quote Originally Posted by tom365 View Post
    Hi, no...I expressed myself in a wrong way. He has already helped them and it is a regular action - he helps them during his stay in Britain.
    What about "while"? would it be acceptable to do so?

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: A question concerning tenses

    Whenever the British politician is in Britain, he tries to help his friends.
    The British politician tries to help his friends whenever he is in Britain.

    Note that the first construction requires a comma but the second doesn't.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. Boris Richard's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: A question concerning tenses

    "While" is used in some conditions. One of them is, to indicate two things that happen at the same time and as the synonym of "when" (only at one time). For example, "I saw John while I was waiting for the bus". I think this condition is what you mean. But your context can't be included in this condition. Because it's a regular action, not at one time. I think you should not use "while". If you kept using "while", it would be "The British politician tried to help his friends while he was in Britain" or "The British politician always tries to help his friends while he is in Britain" (this one is little weird).

    I'm not a teacher.

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