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    #1

    That blog is well famous.

    That blog is well famous.
    Many restaurants invite the blogger to taste their food and write a review in his blog.

    Is the "well" adjective used correct?

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: That blog is well famous.

    I would say 'well-known' or 'very famous'.

    Not a teacher.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: That blog is well famous.

    I am not a teacher.

    In certain parts of England, especially Merseyside, 'well famous' would be possible, but it is colloquial and non-standard.

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    #4

    Re: That blog is well famous.

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonree123456 View Post
    Is the "well" adjective used correctly?
    Only if you want to be very colloquial/slangy.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: That blog is well famous.

    It's not just Merseyside now. The adjective "well" became well-known through a (dreadful) programme called "The Only Way Is Essex". They seem to have introduced it as an alternative to "very" or "really". So many young people watch the show, that it has started to seep into those people's everyday speech. However, I do not recommend using it at all!

    Their most well-known phrase at the moment is "I'm well jel" which apparently means "I'm very jealous". They normally don't even bother with "I'm".

    A: Guess what? I've just bought a souped-up Cortina with a bangin' sound system.
    B: What?! Well jel!

    If I ever hear anyone from this forum using phrases like that, there will be trouble!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: That blog is well famous.

    In other contexts, 'well' as an adverb or adjective is just fine.

    adv.
    in a good or satisfactory manner:Our plans are going well.thoroughly or carefully:Shake the bottle well before using.in a proper manner:That child behaves well in school.excellently:a difficult task that was well handled.with justice or reason:I couldn't very well refuse.with favor or approval:My family thinks well of her.comfortably or prosperously:to live well.to a considerable degree:These grades are well below average.in a close way; intimately:I've known them well.without doubt;
    certainly:I cry easily, as you well know.
    with good nature; without anger:He took the joke well.
    adj.in good health:not a well man; He's not well.
    [be + ~]
    satisfactory or good:All is well.
    [ be + ~ + that clause ]
    proper, fitting, or prudent:It is well that you didn't go.


  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: That blog is well famous.

    I realised that Merseyside and TOWIE don't have a monopoly on this. In the 80s, a character in EastEnders had a dog called "Wellard". I believe this was supposed to be a pun on (or at least sound like) "Well hard", to suggest that the dog was very powerful/strong/dangerous.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: That blog is well famous.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If I ever hear anyone from this forum using phrases like that, there will be trouble!
    I've managed to miss these programmes, which haven't made it out here, so I guess I'm safe.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: That blog is well famous.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I've managed to miss these programmes, which haven't made it out here, so I guess I'm safe.
    Think yourself lucky. TOWIE is enough to make your eyes (and ears) bleed.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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