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    #1

    a wretch to these agonies foredoomed

    "Not even these well contrived securities sufficed to save from the uttermost agonies of living inhumation, a wretch to these agonies foredoomed!"

    Can I rephrase the above-mentioned so as to read: "Not even these well contrived securities sufficed to save a wretch foredoomed to agonies from the uttermost agonies of living inhumation."

    Do they convey the same meaning?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 05-Feb-2015 at 16:01. Reason: Sorted out the formatting.

  1. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a wretch to these agonies foredoomed

    Quote Originally Posted by Mher View Post
    "Not even these well contrived securities sufficed to save from the uttermost agonies of living inhumation, a wretch to these agonies foredoomed!"

    Can I rephrase the above-mentioned so as to read: "Not even these well contrived securities sufficed to save a wretch, foredoomed to these agonies, from the uttermost agonies of living inhumation."

    Do they convey the same meaning?
    Yes - so long as you include the second "these", as shown in red. This is because the original passage makes it clear that the agonies to which the wretch is foredoomed are specifically those of "living intumation".
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 05-Feb-2015 at 16:01. Reason: Fixed the formatting in the quote box
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  2. probus's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: a wretch to these agonies foredoomed

    Never mind the fact that "inhumation" is so rare a word that I have never seen or heard it before in my life. In my opinion you should prefer a synonym if you want to be understood.

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: a wretch to these agonies foredoomed

    Quote Originally Posted by Mher View Post
    "Not even these well contrived securities sufficed to save from the uttermost agonies of living inhumation, a wretch to these agonies foredoomed!"

    Can I rephrase the above-mentioned so as to read: "Not even these well contrived securities sufficed to save a wretch foredoomed to agonies from the uttermost agonies of living inhumation."
    No! You're not rephrasing. Rephrasing is using different words, and you've only changes a few words. To rephrase, you need to say what the passage means in your own words.

    For example: "a wretch to these agonies foredoomed" = an unfortunate person who will not be able to avoid suffering = someone facing a miserable fate.

    That's rephrasing: finding new words to convey the same meaning.

    The idea is to read the passage and then explain it - not repeat it. This will help show how well you understand what you've read.

    Hope that helps!
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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