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    #1

    American English T + Y (CH sound)

    Hi, I heard the phrase "I got your message." pronounced as [ aɪ ˌɡɑt yər ˈmɛs ɪdʒ ] in a movie. As far as I know, the T+Y calls for the tʃ (CH as in church) sound. Are both forms used in the USA? with and without CH sound?
    [ aɪ ˌɡɑt yər ˈmɛs ɪdʒ ]
    [ aɪ ˌɡɑtʃyər ˈmɛs ɪdʒ ]

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: American English T + Y (CH sound)

    Technically, in any language, the "t" should be clearly pronounced at the end of the first word and the "y" should be clearly pronounced at the beginning of the second word.
    In reality, it often comes out as "gotchor" or "gotcha" but that is not an "official" pronunciation of "got" + "your".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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