Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2014
    • Posts: 75
    #1

    Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    The vehicle 1 approached to the traffic signal and reduced speed to be ready to stop but the other car hit it from behind. The police report indicates “vehicle 1 stopped for the traffic signal at the intersection of highway XXX.” Does “stopped for the traffic signal” mean the vehicle 1 completely stopped before the traffic signal or it might still move but ready to stop? What does “stopped for the traffic signal” mean here? Thank you for your answer.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #2

    Re: Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    Yes, "stopped" means completely stopped.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,477
    #3

    Re: Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    If the first sentence is correct, the police report is wrong.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,832
    #4

    Re: Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    If the first sentence is correct, the police report should have said "Vehicle 1 had slowed down at the traffic lights ...".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2014
    • Posts: 75
    #5

    Re: Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    The more details in the police report is “Vehicle 1 and vehicle 2 were travelling westbound on highway XXX. Vehicle 1 stopped for the traffic signal at the intersection of highway XXX. The front bumper of vehicle 2 struck vehicle 1 in the rear bumper.”

    In fact, vehicle 1 had not stopped but approached to the traffic signal. The vehicle 2 hit the vehicle 1 from behind. The vehicle 2 driver was cited. If all you read “stop for traffic signal” means “HAD ALREADY completely stopped before the traffic signal,” I should report the officer that his report is not accurate because both of the vehicle 1 and vehicle 2 had not stopped but were reaching the traffic signal at the time of the car accident. Please help me to read and understand what “stop for” means here again. Thanks.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,817
    #6

    Re: Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    Tell the officer that vehicle 1 was still moving when it was rear-ended.

    Not a teacher.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #7

    Re: Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    I'm not sure what the point is here. If vehicle 2 rear-ended vehicle 1 at the lights, then vehicle 2 is at fault. It does not matter, legally, whether vehicle 1 was slowing down or was stopped (at least in Australian law). Perhaps your law is different.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,864
    #8

    Re: Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    For indicates the reason why the car had stopped. It is not a phrasal verb. The car had stopped and the reason was because of the traffic lights. There is a difference between what you're describing and the police report. I can't see anyway of interpreting the police report as suggesting that the car was moving.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,832
    #9

    Re: Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    The laws in the UK are the same as in Australia from what I can see from Raymott's post. In 99.9% of cases, the driver behind is at fault in a rear-ender. It is a nightmare for that driver to come up with any feasible excuse in order to maintain that the car in front was somehow at fault. It doesn't matter if the driver at the front is moving or not. The police will claim that the driver behind must have been too close to the car in front, so close that they couldn't stop.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,817
    #10

    Re: Does “stopped for” mean completely stopped?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It is a nightmare for that driver to come up with any feasible excuse in order to maintain that the car in front was somehow at fault.
    If the car in front stopped suddenly, i.e. the driver slammed on the brakes, could it be an excuse?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-Jul-2012, 21:22
  2. being stopped
    By jasonlulu_2000 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Jun-2012, 08:37
  3. [General] slack off = reduce the rate of/ die = completely stopped
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Sep-2010, 14:16
  4. had/was stopped
    By jctgf in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 20-Dec-2008, 15:48
  5. the clock stopped/ has stopped
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Dec-2007, 16:30

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •