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    #1

    feature

    What is the meaning of 'feature' in expressions like:
    'feature solid oak flooring' and 'room with feature brick fireplace'?
    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: feature

    Please give us full sentences to consider.

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    #3

    Re: feature

    Well, it looks to me like something from a real estate ad.

    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...g%22&FORM=IGRE

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    #4

    Re: feature

    Yes, Tarheel, I saw it in sales particulars, and it's used as an adjective. Could it mean something like 'unique' or 'special'?

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    #5

    Re: feature

    If I say a house features solid oak flooring the house, of course, is not really doing anything. I am saying I want you to consider that when you think about buying the house. (It's something I think people will find attractive, so I mention it.) If I say a house features a brick fireplace and solid oak flooring I am saying those are things you will notice. They will catch your eye, and they will, hopefully, make you more interested in buying the house.


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    #6

    Re: feature

    Tarheel, I understand the use of 'feature' as a verb or a noun, but in this context it is used like an adjective ('a room with feature brick fireplace'). I suppose this is quite unusual? Does this sound very formal, stilted or even 'wrong'? I mean, real estate agents aren't necessarily very good linguists!

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    #7

    Re: feature

    By the way, it's from a British text.

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    #8

    Re: feature

    It's a typical example of estate agents' jargon.

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    #9

    Re: feature

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It's a typical example of estate agents' jargon.
    That's the trouble with using authentic materials!

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    #10

    Re: feature

    Quote Originally Posted by Julie17 View Post
    Tarheel, I understand the use of 'feature' as a verb or a noun, but in this context it is used like an adjective ('a room with feature brick fireplace'). I suppose this is quite unusual? Does this sound very formal, stilted or even 'wrong'? I mean, real estate agents aren't necessarily very good linguists!
    It seems wrong to me. If that is really what it says ("a room with feature brick fireplace") then it might be from somebody who is clumsy with his words. I just don't think "feature" works as an adjective. (Rover is right that it is real estate jargon.)

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