Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jan 2014
    • Posts: 129
    #1

    consist of/comprise

    1.The course consists of lecture and practicum conducted by the qualified instructor.

    2.The course comprises lecture and practicum conducted by the qualified instructor.

    May I know which of the above phrases is more natural in the contexts?

    Thank you!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,501
    #2

    Re: consist of/comprise

    Neither is correct, although your use of 'consists of'/'comprises' is spot on.

    'The course consists of/comprises lectures and practicums conducted by the qualified instructor.'

    If there is only one lecture and practicum:

    'The course consists of/comprises a lecture and (a) practicum conducted by the qualified instructor.'

    (For a discussion on the plural of practicum, click here: plural of practicum.)

Similar Threads

  1. comprise / is comprised of
    By Tedwonny in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Jan-2013, 12:35
  2. Consist in
    By nyggus in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 31-Jan-2011, 12:11
  3. comprise / comprise of
    By Katz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 27-Jan-2010, 15:18
  4. [Grammar] comprise and consist
    By anupumh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Sep-2009, 13:12
  5. [General] comprise/compose/
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Sep-2009, 06:57

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •