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    #1

    Shove Over, Bump Over, Hit Over

    The phrase "push over" means to push somebody so that he/she falls down on the ground.
    Do native speakers think that I could use "shove over", "bump over" or "hit over" like this:

    1. He shoved her over.
    2. He bumped her over.
    3. He hit her over.
    to mean the act of shoving her, bumping her, or hitting her, respectively, caused her to fall down on the ground?
    Last edited by learningspirit; 18-Feb-2015 at 07:39.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Shove Over, Bump Over, Hit Over

    No.

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    #3

    Re: Shove Over, Bump Over, Hit Over

    Stick to 'He pushed her over' or 'He knocked her over'.

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    #4

    Re: Shove Over, Bump Over, Hit Over

    Is "push over" less common than "knock over"?

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Shove Over, Bump Over, Hit Over

    For me, "push over" sounds deliberate and "knocked over" sounds accidental.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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