Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 559
    #1

    "I wouldn't stand it" vs "I wouldn't stand for it"

    Dear all,

    A: Tom always makes fun of me in front of his friends.
    B: If I were you, I wouldn't stand for it.

    In the dialogue above, is the for in bold necessary? Since I sometimes encounter such expressions as "I can't stand it any more!", "I wouldn't stand it" sounds more natural to my ear.

    Thank you!

    OP

  1. teechar's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Iraq

    • Join Date: Feb 2015
    • Posts: 6,196
    #2

    Re: "I wouldn't stand it" vs "I wouldn't stand for it"

    to stand for something = to accept it.
    to stand something = to bear / tolerate it.
    different !

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 254
    #3

    Re: "I wouldn't stand it" vs "I wouldn't stand for it"

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    to stand for something = to accept it.
    to stand something = to bear / tolerate it.
    different !
    NOT A TEACHER
    Actually, I don't really see the difference based on your answer.
    Please notify me of any mistakes in my posts. It is much appreciated.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,314
    #4

    Re: "I wouldn't stand it" vs "I wouldn't stand for it"

    I am not a teacher.

    Is that just an obsevation or do you really not see the difference?

    If you put them in the negative the difference is even plainer.

    To not stand for something = to not accept it. e.g. I won't stand for your insolence.'
    To not stand something = to dislike it intensely. e.g. 'I can't stand your attitude.'

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 254
    #5

    Re: "I wouldn't stand it" vs "I wouldn't stand for it"

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    Is that just an observation or do you really not see the difference?

    If you put them in the negative the difference is even plainer.

    To not stand for something = to not accept it. e.g. I won't stand for your insolence.'
    To not stand something = to dislike it intensely. e.g. 'I can't stand your attitude.'
    NOT A TEACHER
    What I meant was, based on teechar's answer, I didn't see much of a difference between "to accept" and "to tolerate". If you tolerate something, you'll have to accept it, or at least acquiesce.

    As I see it, the biggest difference between "to stand for something" and "to stand something" is that the former usually goes with "will" while the latter with "can". So,
    "I won't stand for it," implies I'm going to do something to change the situation.
    "I can't stand it," means I hate it or I can't tolerate it, but it doesn't imply whether I'm going to do something about it.
    That's also the point I want to emphasize because the thread's title is: "I wouldn't stand it." vs "I wouldn't stand for it." I don't suppose the one in bold sounds natural.

    Then again, my English knowledge is based mainly on books and dictionaries, so I'd like to hear others' opinion as well.
    Please notify me of any mistakes in my posts. It is much appreciated.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: "I wouldn't stand it" vs "I wouldn't stand for it"

    Quote Originally Posted by optimistic pessimist View Post
    Dear all,

    A: Tom always makes fun of me in front of his friends.
    B: If I were you, I wouldn't stand for it.

    In the dialogue above, is the for in bold necessary? Since I sometimes encounter such expressions as "I can't stand it any more!", "I wouldn't stand it" sounds more natural to my ear.

    Thank you!

    OP
    I would use "stand for it" in that context. That means you would not let it stand.

  4. probus's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 3,459
    #7

    "I wouldn't stand it" vs "I wouldn't stand for it"

    "Thank you" for all the incorrect replies from those who are neither teachers nor native speakers. You are helping a lot (not).

    I agree with MikeNewYork.

    But as a slight aside "I wouldn't stand it" may have been equivalent to "I wouldn't stand for it" in some outdated or rare dialects of BrE.
    Last edited by probus; 19-Feb-2015 at 06:15.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 30-Oct-2014, 08:18
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Apr-2014, 10:27
  3. Does "stand by the piece" mean "support the article"?
    By NewHopeR in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-Aug-2012, 17:25
  4. [Grammar] "couldn't" "wouldn't be able to" in subjunctive mood
    By th.19 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-Oct-2011, 08:13
  5. Car "Wouldn't" Start?
    By mitsuwao23 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-Sep-2010, 23:11

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •