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    Faint and sick


    The text I would like somebody to help me with is as follows:

    "The coroner moved round to the end of the table and undid a silk handkerchief, which had been passed under the chin and knotted on the top of the head. When the handkerchief was drawn away it exposed what had been the throat. Some of the jurors who had risen to get a better view repented their curiosity, and turned away their faces. Witness Harker went to the open window and leaned out across the sill, faint and sick."

    What I want to know is the meaning of the phrase faint and sick in the context of the story extract. Was the man only shocked by the horrible sight he had seen a moment before, needing a frsh air; or was he literally vomitting out of the window?

    The Damned Thing by Ambrose Bierce, 1893

    Thanks for help

  1. teechar's Avatar
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    Re: Faint and sick

    "went to the open window and leaned out across the sill, faint and sick" does not necessarily imply vomiting.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 21-Feb-2015 at 22:03. Reason: Corrected closing punctuation.

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