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    #1

    Lightbulb That has been forced on me

    Hello

    I have came across two expression:

    1. That has been forced on me.
    2. That has been forced dawn right upon me.


    Could anybody please tell me what is the difference between these two bold expressions if any?
    Last edited by bulging; 25-Feb-2015 at 21:55. Reason: topic change

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    #2

    Re: Difference in meaning

    Even if you change 'dawn' to 'down', #2 doesn't make much sense on its own.

    It all depends on the context. What is 'that'?

    bulging, you have been a member long enough to know that a better title would have been That has been forced on me.


    'Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.'

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    #3

    Re: Difference in meaning

    Thank you Rover_KE for you contribution. I haven't had the idea that #2 is wrong since it is from a Song IRON MAIDEN - The Educated Fool.

    Let me please quote the fragment:

    I am an educated fool
    So I don't know what it is I'm supposed to do
    About this awkward situation
    That's been forced down right upon me


    PS
    I have changed the topic to the form it should be.
    Last edited by bulging; 25-Feb-2015 at 23:42. Reason: typo

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    #4

    Re: Difference in meaning

    Poets and songwriters are more concerned about meter and rhyme than about correct English.

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    #5

    Re: Difference in meaning

    bulging, it would have been useful to have had the context in post #1.

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    #6

    Re: Difference in meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by bulging View Post
    I haven't had the idea that #2 is wrong since it is from a Song IRON MAIDEN - The Educated Fool.
    Songs are full of language that would not work in ordinary usage- they're a special area of language use, with different rules.

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