Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2015
    • Posts: 214
    #1

    Path Runs For Miles

    I have a question about the verb "run". According to definition 11a of this dictionary, "run" means "to go or extend in a particular direction" when used to describe roadways/pathways. But then there is this:


    In Boston, a simple red brick path runs for 2.5 miles through the heart of the city, connecting 16 of its Revolutionary sites, ending at Bunker Hill.
    , which does not fit the dictionary definition of "going or extending in a particular direction". Could the example sentence be poor writing?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: Path Runs For Miles

    It fits the definition exactly.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2015
    • Posts: 214
    #3

    Re: Path Runs For Miles

    But the definition only deals with the direction of the path, not the distance of the path.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #4

    Re: Path Runs For Miles

    Do you expect a dictionary definition to specify the length? How could that happen?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2015
    • Posts: 214
    #5

    Re: Path Runs For Miles

    So, I could write "the path runs for three miles", even though that dictionary definition only allows sentences along the lines of "the path runs through the forest"?

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,809
    #6

    Re: Path Runs For Miles

    Definition#1 in the same dictionary mentions no distance either, but it should be correct to say 'I ran for miles'.

    Not a teacher.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #7

    Re: Path Runs For Miles

    Three miles would be fine.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #8

    Re: Path Runs For Miles

    Quote Originally Posted by learningspirit View Post
    So, I could write "the path runs for three miles", even though that dictionary definition only allows sentences along the lines of "the path runs through the forest"?
    On your thinking, the dictionary rules out anything it doesn't explicitly mention. Therefore, you could not use it for paths anyway, because under that definitions of "run", the examples don't mention a path.
    Of course you can write "The path runs for three miles". The dictionary is not attempting to define "runs through" or "runs for". You're meant to be able to work that out.
    11 always followed by an adverb or preposition [no object]

    a : to go or extend in a particular direction

    Is "path" followed by a preposition in "The path runs for three miles"? (Yes)
    Is there an object? (No)
    Does the path go or extend in a particular direction? (Yes)
    What, then, rules out "The path runs for three miles"?
    You are meant to plug in your word - "The path goes or extends in a particular direction for three miles" and, at least as far as the dictionary can help, accept that as a good sentence.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2015
    • Posts: 214
    #9

    Re: Path Runs For Miles

    Could it be that this:


    1. The path runs for three miles.

    by itself is rare because it is usually written instead as:


    2. The path is three miles long.
    , but sentence 1 more common if it is followed by an adverbial or prepositional phrase denoting the direction of road/path, like:


    3. The path runs for three miles along the coastline.
    4. The path runs for three miles through the town.
    ?

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,809
    #10

    Re: Path Runs For Miles

    I agree with you, but I am not a teacher.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [General] blood runs wild /runs hot?
    By maoyueh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 30-Jul-2014, 18:37
  2. we drove the 33 miles
    By Viktor Sorokin in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-May-2013, 19:42
  3. over the miles?
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-May-2011, 23:24
  4. 5 miles ahead towards ?
    By inbochum in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 31-Oct-2008, 06:14
  5. 300 Miles
    By namsteven in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Aug-2008, 20:05

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •