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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Inanimate possessive

    Hi.

    I just found this thread and noticed that it has been closed.

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...4-hours-notice

    The responses here intrigue me as to what you think of the choices in bold form. All my life, I have been using them alternatively, and I don't think that either is wrong. The first one, however, sounds more American to me and the second one more British.


    They work for 3 days a week. They expect to be paid by the end of the 3-day period/the 3 days' period.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Inanimate possessive

    "... to be paid by the end of the 3 days' period" is incorrect.

    They expect to be paid at/by the end of the 3-day period.
    They expect to be paid at/by the end of the 3 days.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: Inanimate possessive

    Thanks. How is '24-hour notice' incorrect then?

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Inanimate possessive

    "24-hour notice" could be used in a phrase like "There is an obligatory 24-hour notice period" but in the context of the post you linked to, we can only use "Please provide at least 24 hours' notice".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: Inanimate possessive

    OK. Not sure if I understand the rule for future reference, but thanks anyway.

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