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    #1

    Conditional

    "We could be the winner if you had kicked the ball." said James after the end of the tournament.

    I use "could be" because being the winner is present but it never happens.
    I use "had kicked" because kicking the ball should be done in past but it never happened.

    Is it grammatically correct to mix up two different conditionals in a sentence?

  1. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Conditional

    If the tournament is over and they're not the winners, then you need to use the third conditional!

    "We could have been the winners if you had kicked the ball."
    or
    "We could have been the winners had you kicked the ball."

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Conditional

    'We would have the trophy now if you had kicked the ball.'
    Is it OK?
    Not a teacher.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Conditional

    Matthew, there are many ways you can express the idea of winning.
    Let's keep this thread about the tenses used in conditionals and not vocabulary about winning.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: Conditional

    Can this be said as below in red?

    "We will be the winner if you kicked the ball." said James after the end of the tournament.

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    #6

    Re: Conditional

    I am not a teacher.

    No, that doesn't work.

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    #7

    Re: Conditional

    No, but before the match you could say "We will be the winners if you kick the ball". Note that "We will win/We could have won" would be more natural in all these examples.

    I'm not sure what sport guarantees a win if one player simply kicks a ball.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Conditional

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Matthew, there are many ways you can express the idea of winning.
    Let's keep this thread about the tenses used in conditionals and not vocabulary about winning.
    The OP asked, 'Is it grammatically correct to mix up two different conditionals in a sentence?' So I wrote the sentence in my post#3, which seemed to be a mixed third / second conditional. Was I wrong?

    Not a teacher.

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    #9

    Re: Conditional

    Thank you for the answers but I don't get this.

    "I had been waiting for 3 hours before you came".
    Why can there be two different tenses in two different clauses?

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    #10

    Re: Conditional

    Perhaps you've been taught that the same tense must be used in every clause in a sentence. Forget it; it's nonsense.

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