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  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Mar 2015
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    Angry Questions

    Hello,
    I am not sure when to use these two sentence:
    1)shall we invite Tony and Tim round tonight?
    2)Are we going to invite Tony and Tim round tonight?
    They both sound similar to me. But there is a different I am sure.
    There is no context as they are taken from an exercise from the course book. Destination B1
    Thank you in advance.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • British English
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      • UK
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      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,838
    #2

    Re: Questions

    1) is a suggestion, an idea being presented.
    2) is a question about later plans. It suggests that the idea has already been discussed and the speaker is wondering if the plan is still going to come to fruition.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • American English
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      • United States
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #3

    Re: Questions

    In AmE we would usually say "over" rather than "round".

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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      • UK
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    #4

    Re: Questions

    They both work in BrE. I say "Are you coming round tonight?" to someone who lives fairly near me and might just come for dinner or something. I would say "Are you coming over?" to someone who has a longer drive ahead of them.

    I go round to my friend Cathy's house - she lives a 10 minute drive away.
    I go over to my dad's house - he lives a 30-minute drive away.
    I go down to my mum's house - she lives a 90-minute drive away (in a south-easterly direction, hence "down").
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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      • China
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      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 837
    #5

    Re: Questions

    Are the words "round" and "over" same meaning here?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • England
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      • England

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    #6

    Re: Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Polyester View Post
    Do the words "round" and "over" same meaning mean the same here?
    Read post #4 again.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #7

    Re: Questions

    I would use "come over" even if the other person was around the corner from me. Another BrE/AmE difference.

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