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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    "to learn (about?) something new"

    It's always fun to learn about something new.
    It's always fun to learn something new.

    What would the difference be if there were no "about"?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "to learn (about?) something new"

    No difference.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "to learn (about?) something new"

    If you learn calculus, for example, you learn a difficult and very useful branch of mathematics that most people never learn. But if you learn about calculus, you may well learn no more than the fact that it is a difficult and very useful branch of mathematics.
    Last edited by probus; 03-Apr-2015 at 05:35.

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    #4

    Re: "to learn (about?) something new"

    I agree with Probus. Learning something means that you know how to do it or how to use it. If you learn English, it means you can have a conversation in English. On the other hand, learning about something means that you know information about something, but you might not actually know how to use it. If you learn about English, you might be able to answer questions about English grammar rules or pronunciation habits, but you can't actually use English in a conversation.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 03-Apr-2015 at 10:43. Reason: Added apostrophe to "can't".

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "to learn (about?) something new"

    I don't think the distinction is that clear. When one learns about physics, one often studies physics.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "to learn (about?) something new"

    For me, there is a difference. If I learn French, then I learn how to speak the language, I learn the grammar and the vocabulary and eventually, I can converse confidently in that language. If I learn about French, I might learn (in English) that is the national language of France and several other countries, that it is a Romance language and that it has been around for XXX number of years. None of that helps me to converse with a native French speaker.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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