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    #1

    deeply satisfying whoing-bang slam of a screen door

    Hi, I cannot understand the meaning of the red parts of the following sentence from “I’m a stranger here myself” by Bill Bryson. Would you please explain it to me? Thanks a lot.


    As well, there has been the constant, unexpected joy of reencountering all those things I grew up with but had largely forgotten: baseball on the radio, the deeply satisfying whoing-bang slam of a screen door in summer, insects that glow, sudden run-for-your-life thunderstorms, really big snowfalls, Thanksgiving and the Fourth of July, the smell of a skunk from just the distance that you have to sniff the air quizzically and say: "Is that a skunk?", Jell-O with stuff in it, the pleasingly comical sight of oneself in shorts. All that counts for a lot, in a strange way. So, on balance, I was wrong. You can go home again. Just bring extra money for road maps and remember to ask for spackle.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: deeply satisfying whoing-bang slam of a screen door

    Do you know about onomatopoeia? "Whoing-bang" is an example of it. The writer thinks that is what the noise of a screen door slamming sounds like.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: deeply satisfying whoing-bang slam of a screen door

    Jell-O is American for 'jelly'. The items in jars labelled 'jelly' is American jam.
    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=jelly&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=639&tbm=isch&tb o=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=rvYpVYW0H6avmAXxlIHoDw&ved =0CCIQsAQ

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    #4

    Re: deeply satisfying whoing-bang slam of a screen door

    Thank you all, but I do not know why the author think that the voice of a slammed door is joying?!

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: deeply satisfying whoing-bang slam of a screen door

    As an adult, you walk out the door, close it behind you, turn and lock it, and walk away.

    As a care-free kid, you run out of the house and just let the screen door slam closed behind you. It's nostalgia.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: deeply satisfying whoing-bang slam of a screen door

    In AmE, Jello has nothing to do with jelly or jam. We have all three.

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    #7

    Re: deeply satisfying whoing-bang slam of a screen door

    Jello is a brand name which is used generically for the fruit-flavored gelatin dessert.
    Jam is a sweet spread made with fruit, to put on your toast or other bread product.
    Jelly is the same as jam, but made with fruit juice rather than fruit itself.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: deeply satisfying whoing-bang slam of a screen door

    In BrE, "jelly" is the fruit-flavoured gelatine dessert. It's eaten on its own or as part of a trifle or as part of "jelly and ice cream", a kids' favourite. "Jell-o" is not used in BrE. Most of us know it either as the brand name of a jelly in America or as the AmE generic term for the substance.

    "Jam" is fruit boiled up with sugar and pectin. It's then used in sandwiches, on toast, as a layer in a cake, spread on scones in the famous English cream tea, or stirred into rice pudding.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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