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    #1

    Nominate

    I have a question about the usage of the verb "nominate". Suppose the context is membership of some group (like committee). According to dictionaries, "nominate" has two similar but very different meanings that are suitable for this context:

    M1. propose someone to join some group
    M2. propose someone as a candidate to join some group
    Now, I have these two sentences:

    S1. He was nominated to the Supreme Court.
    S2. He was nominated to the executive committee.
    Could sentences S1 and S2 be ambiguous, because meanings M1 and M2 seem to work in both sentences?

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    #2

    Re: Nominate

    The meanings aren't all that different. The difference is whether the person nominating has the full authority to fill the position, or if the nomination must be approved.

    The President of the US nominates members of the Supreme Court (whenever there is a vacancy). This nomination must be approved by a vote of the Senate.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Nominate

    'Nominate' simply means something like 'name'. You can name someone for a position, but that doesn't mean they are appointed. It can be an ambiguous word.
    If you nominate a date for a meeting, that is the date (barring objections). If you nominate a film for Best Film, it has to be voted on.
    To me, 'nominate' generally suggests something preliminary, not official.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Nominate

    I am not a teacher.

    Nominate also means appoint. This is the meaning that I understand from S1 and S2, mainly due to the use of 'to'. If it had been 'for' instead, I would think that the nomination had not yet been approved/ratified.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Nominate

    For me, "nominate" does not mean "appoint". A nomination still has to be approved.

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    #6

    Re: Nominate

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    For me, "nominate" does not mean "appoint". A nomination still has to be approved.
    Not A Teacher

    It has both meanings, I think that in AmE the idea that nominate needs approval is more common than in BrE due to your political system.

    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/de...glish/nominate

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Nominate

    Possibly true. Then why not use "appoint"?

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    #8

    Re: Nominate

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Possibly true. Then why not use "appoint"?
    Not A Teacher

    Why use any synonym of a particular word, it is down to the choice of the person writing the sentence.

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