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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    out for...

    Dear teachers,

    I have a question to ask you:

    Our US friend sent us an email,as follows. What does "out" and "in" mean in the fine chemical field?


    Out for loss on drying
    Out for turbidity
    in for ash content

    Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: out for...

    Surely there is some other context. Is he talking about test results? Is it "in" or "out" of spec/tolerance?

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    #3

    Re: out for...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Surely there is some other context. Is he talking about test results? Is it "in" or "out" of spec/tolerance?
    Thanks for your prompt reply..

    Yes, he is talking about test results. I guess "in" means in-spec and "out" means out-of-spec here, but I was wondering, if so, why they are written as "in" and "out" instead of their the full forms. And if possible, could you please give me another example? Thanks again!

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    #4

    Re: out for...

    It would be awfully laborious and redundant to keep writing "of spec" when both the writer and the reader understand what is being talked about. It is the "in" or "out" that is the important piece of information. It could be done with green checks and red X's.

  3. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: out for...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    It would be awfully laborious and redundant to keep writing "of spec" when both the writer and the reader understand what is being talked about. It is the "in" or "out" that is the important piece of information. It could be done with green checks and red X's.
    Understood.. Thank you for your help!

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