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    #1

    Royals - should they really be dealt with as in national press in academic writing?

    Hi,

    this is a question of style perhaps, rather than grammar. Hope that you still find it interesting.

    I am writing a paper together with some other people, citizens of a monarchy. They are referring to their head of state as:
    "His Majesty write..." or "H M [name of king]", etc. We are writing for an international academic publication channel. But it does not have a copy-editor that I can ask directly. Surely it must be better to say: Thailand's King BlaBla wrote "hum hum" (BlaBla, 1999)?

    I am not a big fan of royalties, so if I get a chance to treat them as normal people, I'll do that. But my royalist co-writers may need some source to get convinced. I have not been able to find any style guide treating this issue. The same question will apply for ministers, the pope, "holy" men, saints, university vice-chancellors, etc. ?

    Grammar Republicans, unite and help me :)

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Royals - should they really be dealt with as in national press in academic writin

    I take it this is an academic paper. Terms such as "his majesty" and "his highness" etc. have no place in academic English. Instead of His Majesty or HM, you can always write simply "the king", or "king whatever his name and number may be", e.g. George IV.

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    #3

    Re: Royals - should they really be dealt with as in national press in academic writin

    Yes, it is an academic paper. Thanks. I was thinking the same, but then came to think that the title ought to be removed as well, since it is a title? Some examples:
    "The king condemned the act." OK(here, "king" is a role description)
    "Outraged, King Woodcock condemned the act." Not OK (Here, it is a title, on par with "Professor Woodcock", "Dr. Woodcock", etc, which is not included in running texts in academic paper.
    "Outraged, Woodcock, condemned the act." OK (of course, one may need to tell the reader that Woodcock is king of this or that country, but that is not a grammar question).

  2. probus's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Royals - should they really be dealt with as in national press in academic writin

    I think we are in agreement here. Simply "the king" is best, unless the context requires you to distinguish one king from another.

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