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    #1

    Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    Hi all,

    I'd like to ask a question. I understand that you have to capitalise the first letter of a name, like John.
    I also understand that we can capitalise the first letter of name substitutes in relationships, for example: Don't call Dad today.

    However, I don't know what to do with this...

    Don't call little old mouse today. Should I write: "Don't call Little Old Mouse today"?

    Please help.

    Thanks in advance.

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    #2

    Re: Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    That is a given name or a nickname, so it needs to be capitalized.

    not a teacher

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    The same should apply to pet names.

    Not a teacher.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    The same should apply to pet names.
    True, and 'pet names' refer to both the names of one's pets, and to the cutesy names one gives to one's girlfriend/boyfriend.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    Matthew Wai, I would like to point out that your use of "should" is frequently inappropriate. I don't know if you're trying to say "I think XXX is right" or something similar but "should" doesn't convey the same thing.
    Each time you write "XXX should also be correct" or something similar, it sounds as if it's about to be followed by "... but it's not" or " ... but that's not what you said".

    The same applies to your post in this thread - "The same should apply to pet names". You need to write either "The same applies to pet names" (if you know that for certain) or "I think/believe that the same applies to pet names" (if you're not 100% certain).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Each time you write "XXX should also be correct" or something similar, it sounds as if it's about to be followed by "... but it's not" or " ... but that's not what you said".
    Could it be followed by '... if no teachers thought otherwise'?

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    I took you to mean "And learners should use capitals for pet names too."
    But you might have meant "In that case, then I/one would assume that capitalisation also applies to pet names."
    Why don't you tell us what you meant before asking more questions that assume that we know what you meant?

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/should
    I used 'should' according to definition#2. Was I wrong?

    Not a teacher.

  7. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Matthew Wai, I would like to point out that your use of "should" is frequently inappropriate. I don't know if you're trying to say "I think XXX is right" or something similar but "should" doesn't convey the same thing.
    Each time you write "XXX should also be correct" or something similar, it sounds as if it's about to be followed by "... but it's not" or " ... but that's not what you said".

    The same applies to your post in this thread - "The same should apply to pet names". You need to write either "The same applies to pet names" (if you know that for certain) or "I think/believe that the same applies to pet names" (if you're not 100% certain).
    I suspect that Matthew spends a lot of time listening to Americans. We often use "should" the way he does in your examples.

    - A pound of pasta should do it.
    - They should be here any time.


    It expresses expectation.

    You're absolutely right about the meaning of the word, and he should (should!) pay attention. But when he says: "XXX should also be correct," American English speakers take him to mean: "If I'm right, then XXX should also be correct."

    And that's how I read his sentence.

    Bonus alternate usage: My Jewish grandmother used to say things like "You should live so long." (Meaning "Don't get your hopes up, it will never happen.")
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  8. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Capitalization - words that are used as names but aren't real names

    No, I don't think you could have been. 2. is about advice. "The same should apply to pet names" isn't giving advice. It's not about what people should do.
    What I was asking was for you to explain your meaning, not look up a dictionary, but just say what you meant in different words (without should). Only you know what you meant. And we can't tell you if adding or subtracting anything would make a difference to your message unless we know what the message is.

    "should
    2 advice

    used to give or ask for advice:

    What should I do? Should I trust him?
    You should read his new book.
    I should stay in bed if I were you."



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