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    #1

    I am not sure

    . I am not sure as to why you say that interest is not payable to IEDCL. Can you give the contract references as to why this is not payable?



    I understand that after Why "do" will come to make the sentence correct.

    Also would like understand why do we use "as to". Can't we simply write: Can you give the contract references,why this is not payable?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I am not sure

    "As to" is widely misused in English.

    I am not sure why ...
    Can you say why ...?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I am not sure

    I am not a teacher.

    'I am not sure as to why you say that interest is not payable to IEDCL.' This is not a question, and that's why there is no 'do' after the 'why'. The words 'as to' are just filler and completely superfluous; a sort of meaningless business-speak.

    Why do you say that interest is not payable to IEDCL? This is a question.

    'Can you give the contract references as to why this is not payable?' The question here is 'Can you give the contract references?', not 'Why is this not payable?' The words 'as to' in this context mean, that would make clear/that justify/that explain.

    You can't just say, 'Can you give the contract references, why this is not payable?' but you can say, 'Can you tell me why this is not payable?'

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    #4

    Re: I am not sure

    Quote Originally Posted by suniljain View Post
    . I am not sure as to why you say that interest is not payable to IEDCL. Can you give the contract references as to why this is not payable?
    Roman is correct, but I'd like to add to it. The following are both questions, but only one uses 'do'.
    "Why do you say that interest is not payable?"
    "Will you tell me why you say that interest is not payable?

    On the other hand, sometimes 'do' is used in a non-question:
    Dialog:
    A: "Don't tell me you don't steal from the shops. I know you do [steal from the shops]."
    B: "I don't steal."
    A: "You do steal! I know that because I've seen you do it."

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    #5

    Re: I am not sure

    I understand: "Why this is not payable" is also a question and every interrogative sentence would be followed by the "auxiliary verb".

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    #6

    Re: I am not sure

    "Why this is not payable" is not a question. The word order is wrong. "Why is this not payable?" is a question.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: I am not sure

    Can you tell me why is this not payable?

    Is the above sentence correct?

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: I am not sure

    No.

    I think you need to go back to basics with "Wh-" questions. If the question starts with "Who/What/Why/When/Where", we invert the subject and the verb.

    Who am I?
    I am Bob.

    What is it?
    It is a cat.

    Why has it stopped?
    It has stopped because it's broken.

    Where are you?
    I am in Hawaii.

    When will you eat breakfast?
    I will eat breakfast at 8am.

    "Can you tell me why ..." is not a question which starts with a "Wh-" word. The correct version of that sentence is "Can you tell me why this is not payable?"

    It is confusing, we don't deny that. You are going to have to study these constructions in your own time or ask your teacher to revise them.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: I am not sure

    Can I conclude that if sentences starts with "WH" then the auxiliary verb will follow else the same is not required?

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: I am not sure

    Quote Originally Posted by suniljain View Post
    if sentences starts with "WH" then the auxiliary verb will follow
    'What you said is not true.'
    No auxiliary verb follows the wh- word here.

    Not a teacher.

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